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ASPET Annual Meeting at EB 2013 - Program

Saturday, April 20, 2013 - Wednesday, April 24, 2013
Boston, MA

 

Saturday Sessions  Tuesday Afternoon Sessions 
Sunday Morning Sessions  Wednesday Morning Sessions 
Sunday Afternoon Sessions  Wednesday Afternoon Sessions 
Monday Morning Sessions  Divisional Programming Schedule 
Monday Afternoon Sessions  Lecture Schedule 
Tuesday Morning Sessions   

 

Friday, April 19

For the past four years, ASPET members attending the ASPET Annual Meeting at EB 2013 have spent a day volunteering in the local communities of the host city: In 2009, we built homes with Habitat for Humanity in the Upper 9th Ward in New Orleans; in 2010, 2011, and 2012 we prepared and served meals to homeless residents of Pasadena, Washington, DC, and San Diego, respectively. The Behavioral Pharmacology Division of ASPET is again sponsoring a volunteer opportunity at EB 2013 in Boston. We will spend Friday, April 19, 2013, helping Cradles to Crayons provide children living in homeless or low-income situations in Boston with the essential items they need to thrive. Special thanks to Iggy’s Bread of the World, Shaw's, Star Market, and Stop & Shop for their generous donations to help feed our volunteers! Further details will follow to those who express an interest in volunteering. If you plan to join us, please contact Charles P. France at france@uthscsa.edu, 210-567-6969 (voice), or 210-567-0104 (fax) at your earliest convenience.

Behavioral Pharmacology Society Meeting
Westin Boston Waterfront, Commonwealth Ballroom B/C
6:00 PM – 11:00 PM
 

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Saturday, April 20


Behavioral Pharmacology Society Meeting
Westin Boston Waterfront, Grand Ballroom E
8:00 AM – 6:00 PM

2013 Teaching Institute: Training Models for Undergraduate Pharmacology: US/UK Perspectives
Boston Convention Center, Room 108
Noon – 2:30 PM
Chair: Nick J. Goulding, Barts and the London Sch. of Med. and Dentistry

     Setting an agenda for undergraduate pharmacology
     Nick J. Goulding, Barts and the London Sch. of Med. and Dentistry

     Undergraduate degrees in the UK: Where are we going?

     Susan Brain, King’s Col. London

     Educating the next generation of in-vivo pharmacologists: Meeting the needs of industry and academia

     David Lewis, Univ. of Leeds, Sch. of Biomed. Sci.

     Pharmacology for undergraduates: The Duke model
     Rochelle D. Schwartz-Bloom, Duke Univ. Med. Ctr.

     Toward an integrated undergraduate pharmacology curriculum
     Robert Watson, State Univ. of New York at Stony Brook

     Panel Q & A: Future prospects for undergraduate education in pharmacology: An agenda for ASPET and BPS
 

Graduate Student Colloquium: Introducing the Individual Development Plan: A Key to Success
Boston Convention Center, Room 107C
2:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Chair: Lynn Wecker, University of South Florida
Break-out session group leaders: Marcus DeLatte, FDA, Silver Spring; Christine C. Carrico, ASPET; Ann Hanna-Mitchell, Univ. of Pittsburgh Sch. of Med.; Mary Jeanne Kallman, Covance Labs.; Harriet Kamendi, AstraZeneca; Susan Ingram, Oregon Hlth. & Sci. Univ.

As Yogi Berra once said, "You got to be careful if you don't know where you're going, because you might not get there.” Although Yogi was likely not thinking about a scientific career when he made that statement, the concept of the Individual Development Plan (IDP) as a tool to help individuals assess their skills, interests and values, has been used in the business and governmental sectors for some time, and has now permeated academia.  Simply put, the IDP is typically used to identify professional goals and objectives, assess one's skill set relative to these goals, and develop a plan (both short-term and long-term) to acquire the skills required to achieve these goals.  Most resources would agree that the IDP is currently recognized as the best practice in promoting professional development , and is recognized as an important, valuable and beneficial tool for professionals at all career stages with all types of goals.  It also serves as a communications tool, enabling graduate students to communicate their long and short term goals with their mentors.  Creating an IDP at the beginning of graduate school can lead to more effective time management and use of resources, and more focused efforts, targeted towards achieving career goals.

This colloquium will begin with a brief overview of ASPET’s new mentoring program and will quickly move into a synopsis of the steps used to create an IDP.  You will learn how to map out your general career trajectory, match your skills and strengths with your career choices, and identify areas for development that build upon your current strengths. Once the process and steps are presented, attendees will begin to create their own IDP and should expect to have a solid first version by the time they complete the workshop,  keeping in mind that the IDP is a 'living document'  that continuously evolves throughout one's career.

     Individual Development Plan: A Key to Success
     Lynn Wecker, Univ. of South Florida

     Introduction to ASPET mentoring program
     Remy Brim, Bioethics Dept./NIH

     Career Path Speakers:
     Gunther Kern, AstraZeneca, Boston

     Federico Bernal, NCI/NIH

     Maja Köhn, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Heidelberg

     Stephani Sutherland, Freelance Science Writer, Scientific American MIND and Pain Research Forum

     Myron Toews, Univ. of Nebraska Med. Ctr.

     Mary Jeanne Kallman, Covance Labs.

     Break-out session group leaders:
     Myron Toews, Univ. of Nebraska Med. Ctr.

     Christine K. Carrico, ASPET

     Ann Hanna-Mitchell, Univ. of Pittsburgh Sch. of Med.

     Mary Jeanne Kallman, Covance Labs.

     Harriet Kamendi, AstraZeneca

     Susan Ingram, Oregon Hlth. & Sci. Univ.

ASPET Business Meeting
Boston Convention Center, Room 107AB
6:00 PM – 7:30 PM

ASPET Opening and Awards Reception
Boston Convention Center, SW Lobby
7:30 PM – 9:30 PM
Sponsored by the National Board of Medical Examiners and Pharmacology Research & Perspectives
 

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Sunday, April 21, AM


Diversity Mentoring Breakfast
Westin Boston Waterfront, Revere
7:30 AM – 9:30 AM

Workshop: Art of Item Writing (NBME style) and Basics of Assessment
Westin Boston Waterfront, Grand Ballroom E
9:00 AM – 12:30 PM
ASPET gratefully acknowledges the educational grant from the National Board of Medical Examiners for supporting this workshop.
Sponsored by the Division for Pharmacology Education
Chair: Senthil Kumar Rajasekaran, Oakland Univ. William Beaumont Sch. of Med.

Reflecting world-wide shifts toward integrative curricula, this workshop focuses on writing MCQ exams for basic science courses that assess the application of knowledge to clinical situations and interpreting the data obtained from student performance. Following an introduction to the topic, three 60 minute sessions will be conducted to:
1) provide guidance and hands-on training in constructing and critiquing case-based assessment items;
2) help to understand the basics of exam item analysis and the ways one can interpret the results; and
3) discuss hot topics in medical education, including potential teaching and assessment methods for educational research.

    Introduction to the workshop: Importance of correct item writing and current trends in recognizing educational research
     Senthil Kumar Rajasekaran, Oakland Univ. William Beaumont Sch. of Med.

    Developing high-quality multiple-choice test items for basic sciences 

    Mark Raymond, National Board of Medical Examiners

    Setting pass/fail standards: Discussing item analysis 
    Mark Raymond, National Board of Medical Examiners

    Hot topics in medical education research
    Lynn Crespo, Univ. of South Carolina Sch. of Med., Greenville

Orthostatic intolerance: Insights into pharmacologic, physiologic and gender issues
Boston Convention Center, Room 106
9:30 AM – Noon
Sponsored by the Divisions for Cardiovascular Pharmacology & Integrative Systems, Translational and Clinical Pharmacology
Chairs: Julian Stewart, New York Med. Col. and Amy Arnold, Vanderbilt Univ. Sch. of Med.

Standing up from a supine or seated position depends on rapid cardiovascular adaptations that are driven by an interplay of autonomic, volume and hormonal mechanisms. The inability of these mechanisms to adequately compensate for changes in posture results in orthostatic intolerance. A growing number of disorders have been associated with orthostatic intolerance and all are more prevalent in women. This symposium will explore the underlying physiologic mechanisms, gender difference and current pharmacologic targets for both acute and chronic forms of orthostatic intolerance, including syncope, fatigue, and postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome.

    Vasovagal syncope: putative triggers and pharmacological and physiological approaches to management
     Roger Hainsworth, Univ. of Leeds

     Neural and non-neural control of orthostatic intolerance: implications for sex differences
     Qi Fu, Texas Healthy Presbyterian Hosp. Dallas

     Identifying sympathetic nervous system abnormalities in orthostatic intolerance
     Elisabeth Lambert, Human Neurotransmitter Lab.

     Ehlers Danlos Syndrome, joint hypermobility and orthostatic intolerance
     Peter Rowe, Johns Hopkins Children's Ctr.

     Hypo-osmolality pressor stimulus is linked to transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 (TRPV4) in the portal region
     Junior Speaker: Tu Mai, Vanderbilt Univ.

     Loss of muscle sympathetic nerve activity and blood pressure phase synchronization in postural vasovagal syncope
     Junior Speaker: Christopher E. Schwartz, New York Med. Col.

Novel functions for cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases and their implications for pharmacological intervention
Boston Convention Center, Room 107AB
9:30 AM – Noon
Sponsored by the Divisions for Molecular Pharmacology; Cardiovascular Pharmacology; Integrative Systems, Translational and Clinical Pharmacology; and Neuropharmacology

Chair: Marco Conti, UCSF

Phosphodiesterases (PDEs), the enzymes that degrade and inactivate cyclic nucleotides, are considered critical components in cellular homeostasis, and the design of PDE inhibitors occupies a prime role in pharmacology. The discovery of several new genes and numerous variants has broadened the applications of PDE pharmacology. Genetic models and selective inhibitors have uncovered a host of new functions that can be ascribed to a specific PDE isoform. This session will focus on how the integration of specific PDE variants into macromolecular complexes with receptors, channels and kinases provides novel insights into the generation of signaling microdomains and the specificity of cellular responses to external cues.

    Domain structure and interactions in cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases: An atomic view of PDE regulation
     Jayvardhan Pandit, Pfizer Global R&D, Groton Labs.

     Novel insights into the mechanism of action of beta-adrenergic antagonists: Modulation of PDE4-beta-adrenergic receptor complexes
     Wito Richter, UCSF

     Phosphodiesterases and cyclic nucleotide compartments in the regulation of cardiac function
     Rodolphe Fischmeister, Univ. de Paris-Sud XI, France

     PDE inhibitors and the treatment of airway inflammation
     Clive Page, King’s College, London

     Post translation regulation of PDE10 and the implication in their physiological role in the CNS and in drug discovery
     Nicholas Brandon, AstraZeneca, Cambridge

Correlating structure and function of drug metabolizing enzymes: An ongoing challenge
Boston Convention Center, Room 107C
9:30 AM – Noon
Sponsored by the Divisions for Drug Metabolism & Toxicology
Chairs: Emily Scott, Univ. of Kansas and Eric Johnson, Scripps Res. Inst.

The diversity and flexibility of many of the active sites of human drug metabolizing enzymes with different ligands makes correlations between structure and function an ongoing challenge. The design of specific inhibitors of certain cytochrome P450 enzymes requires knowledge of the enzyme structure and the ability to integrate biophysical and computational approaches to understand function. This symposium will explore the ways that cytochrome P450 enzymes are being used as drug targets by exploring the use of traditional (NMR) and newer (structure-based ADMET) methods to predict metabolism.

    Cytochrome P450 Structure: Common themes and variations on the theme
     Eric Johnson, Scripps Res. Inst.

     Investigations of human cytochrome P450 enzymes with solution NMR
     Emily Scott, Univ. of Kansas

     Predicting ligand interactions with metabolizing enzymes: An in silico structure-based approach
     Maria Miteva, Univ. Paris Diderot

     Novel pharmacoenhancer cobicistat: Discovery and development of a CYP3A inhibitor
     Lianhong Xu, Gilead Sci., Inc.

     Physical interactions among NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase, CYP1A2, and CYP2B4 in the endoplasmic reticulum
     Junior Speaker: John Connick, LSUHSC New Orleans
 

Cognitive enhancers for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders
Boston Convention Center, Room 108
9:30 AM – Noon
Sponsored by the Divisions for Behavioral Pharmacology; Integrative Systems, Translational and Clinical Pharmacology; and Neuropharmacology
Chairs: Kathleen M. Kantak, Boston Univ. and Roger D. Spealman, Harvard Med. Sch.

There is a current trend of exploring cognitive-enhancing therapeutic drugs as treatments for a number of neuropsychiatric disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease, schizophrenia, anxiety and drug addiction. This session will review novel preclinical research currently being done to discover new drug targets across a spectrum of disorders. Findings show a striking similarity in the drug targets that have been examined across multiple neuropsychiatric disorders and it now seems likely that the discovery of safe and effective cognitive-enhancing therapeutic drugs for one disorder may translate to other disorders with neurocognitive deficits.

    Targets for cognitive-enhancing pharmacotherapy
     Joseph G. Wettstein, F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd.

     Translational approaches to cognitive enhancing drugs for neuropsychiatric disorders
     Trevor W. Robbins, Univ. of Cambridge

     Novel cholinergic-based therapeutic strategies for Alzheimer’s disease and age-related memory decline
     Alvin V. Terry, Georgia Hlth. Sci. Univ.

     Therapeutic uses of cognitive enhancers in rat and monkey models of drug addiction
     Bríd Á Nic Dhonnchadha, Boston Univ.

     Neuroplasticity in rodent models of fear extinction and use of cognitive enhancers
     Gary B. Kaplan, VA Boston Healthcare System

     Summary and discussion

     Kathleen M. Kantak, Boston Univ. and Roger D. Spealman, Harvard Med. Sch.

Emerging technologies for delivering neurotherapeutics across the blood-brain barrier
Boston Convention Center, Room 109A
9:30 AM – Noon
Sponsored by the Divisions for Integrative Systems, Translational and Clinical Pharmacology; Cardiovascular Pharmacology; Drug Discovery and Development; and Neuropharmacology
Chairs: Nisha Nanaware-Kharade, Univ. of Arkansas for Med. Sci. and Eric C. Peterson, Univ. of Arkansas for Med. Sci.

The blood brain barrier is vital for CNS homeostasis and the preservation of neuronal integrity. It also plays a role in the pathology and progression of a broad spectrum of CNS disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease, ALS, Parkinson’s disease as well as presenting a challenging barrier to delivering drugs into the CNS. This symposium will highlight some of the new technologies developed for delivering drugs across the BBB, including neurosurgical techniques, chemical-based strategies that modify the physicochemical properties of the drug, and biotechnology-based strategies which “trick” the endogenous BBB transporters.

     Blood-brain barrier modeling for therapeutic screening purposes
     Eric Shusta, Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison

     Principles for targeting tight junction proteins and functions
     Maria Balda, Univ. Col. London, Inst. of Ophthalmology

     Intranasal drugs, biopharmaceuticals and stem cells bypass the blood-brain barrier to treat Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, stroke, brain tumors, PTSD, TBI and other CNS disorders

     Willam H. Frey, Regions Hosp.

     Gene delivery across the blood brain barrier for treating neurological disorders
     Brian Kaspar, Nationwide Children's Hosp.

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Sunday, April 21, PM


/uploadedImages/Awards_and_Fellowships/ASPET_Awards/Pasternak (Axelrod)_cropped.jpgJULIUS AXELROD AWARD LECTURE
Boston Convention Center, Room 107AB
2:00 PM – 2:50 PM
Gavril W. Pasternak, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center
No pain, big gain: Truncated mu opioid receptor splice variants as drug targets
Introduction: Kim Neve, VA Med. Ctr.

JULIUS AXELROD SYMPOSIUM: Expanding the repertoire of G-protein coupled opioid receptor targets
Supported by the John V. Croker Fund
Boston Convention Center, Room 107AB
3:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Chair: Gavril W. Pasternak, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center

     Alternative pre-RNA splicing of the mu opioid receptor gene: Insight into complex mu opioid actions
     Ying-Xian Pan, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center

     Opioid receptor heteromers: New pharmacology and new therapeutic possibilities
     Lakshmi A. Devi, Mount Sinai Sch. of Med.

     Biased agonism and trafficking: Discriminating opioid drug actions by receptor endocytosis

     Mark Von Zastrow, UCSF

     The genetics of opioid analgesia
     Jeffrey Mogil, McGill Univ.

Translating pharmacology into career choices in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry
Boston Convention Center, Room 106
3:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Sponsored by the Divisions for Pharmacology Education; Drug Discovery and Development; and Integrative Systems, Translational and Clinical Pharmacology
Chairs: Janet Clark, Drexel Univ. Col. of Med. and other chair TBD

The integration of pharmacology into the complex fabric of drug discovery and development emphasizes just how critical the discipline is to evaluating a compound, assessing its therapeutic potential, evaluating liabilities and then integrating all of this into making a decision about progression into humans. Leading pharmacologists in the various specialty areas of expertise that contribute to the drug discovery and development process will discuss how their pharmacological specialties contribute to the process and share how they determined their career paths.

     Educational initiatives in pharmacology for a career in the pharmaceutical or biotechnology industry
     James Barrett, Drexel Univ. Col. of Med.

     Pharmacology in target identification and validation
     Peter Hutson, Shire Pharmaceut.

     Pharmacogenetics in drug discovery and development
     David Stone, Merck Res. Labs.

     Pharmacoepidemiology: Studying drugs in populations
     Sean Hennessy, Perelman Sch. of Med. at the Univ. of Pennsylvania

     Clinical pharmacology and the development of drugs
     Darrell Abernethy, FDA, Annapolis

Epigenetic control of drug metabolism and transport
Boston Convention Center, Room 107C
3:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Sponsored by the Divisions for Drug Metabolism; Drug Discovery and Development; Integrative Systems, Translational and Clinical Pharmacology; Molecular Pharmacology; and Toxicology
Chairs: Aiming Yu, Univ. at Buffalo, SUNY and Yoichi Osawa, Univ. of Michigan

The importance of genetic factors in the control of drug metabolism is well recognized; however there is also increasing evidence that drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters are regulated by epigenetic factors such as DNA methylation, histone modification, and noncoding RNA mechanisms. This session will introduce new findings on epigenetic regulatory mechanisms in drug metabolism and transport and the impact of epigenetic factors on the pharmacological and toxicological effects of drugs and their implications in therapy.

    Overview of genetic and epigenetic mechanisms underlying variable drug metabolism and drug response
     Magnus Ingelman-Sundberg, Karolinska Inst., Stockholm

     Chromatin modification in control of drug metabolism during liver development
     Xiaobo Zhong, Univ. of Connecticut Sch. of Med.

     Role of epigenetic mechanisms in differential regulation of the dioxin-inducible CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 genes
     Oliver Hankinson, UCLA David Geffen Sch. of Med.

     Noncoding RNAs in post-transcriptional control of drug metabolism and transport
     Aiming Yu, Univ. at Buffalo, SUNY

     Long noncoding RNAs and transcription of cytochrome P450s in mouse liver during maturation
     Junior Speaker: Lai Peng, Univ. of Connecticut

Innate immunity and cardiovascular disease: Unfolding the therapeutic potential of toll-like receptors
Boston Convention Center, Room 108
3:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Sponsored by the Divisions for Cardiovascular Pharmacology & Integrative Systems, Translational and Clinical Pharmacology
Chairs: R. Clinton Webb, Georgia Hlth. Sci. Univ. and Styliana Goulopoulou, Georgia Hlth. Sci. Univ.

Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are pattern recognition receptors that activate the innate immune response. In addition to exogenous infections ligands, TLRs sense certain endogenous molecules that are released during host tissue injury/death. Activation of TLRs leads to the activation of NF-kB and the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines that may have both beneficial (repair) and detrimental (Inflammation) effects on the host. TLRs are expressed not only in immune cells but also in cardiac and vascular tissue, suggesting that TLRs may be a link between innate immunity, inflammation, and cardiovascular disease. This session will address newly discovered TLR-associated molecular pathways that are involved in the genesis of endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular remodeling characterizing various cardiovascular pathologies. The therapeutic potential of TLR manipulation will be discussed.

     Danger, tissue injury and immunity
     Polly Matzinger, NIAID, NIH

     Toll-like receptors in gestational hypertension
     Brett Mitchell, Texas A&M Hlth. Sci. Ctr.

     The impact of sex on innate and adaptive immunity in hypertension
     Jennifer C. Sullivan, Georgia Regents University

     Toll-like receptors: Therapeutic targets in cardiovascular disease?
     Claudia Monaco, Imperial Col. London

     The influence of methadone on toll-like receptor 4 and human mu opioid receptor expression
     Junior Speaker: Summer Dodson, Oklahoma State Univ.

     Chronic Toll-like receptor 9 activation mediates heightened vascular contractility via attenuated NOS activity in isolated aortic segments
     Junior Speaker: Cameron McCarthy, Georgia Hlth. Scie. Univ.

     Testosterone induces activation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway in VSMC by mechanisms involving ROS generation
     Junior Speaker: Rheure Lopes, Univ. of Sao Paulo

Therapeutic approaches for erectile dysfunction (ED) and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH): Present & future
Boston Convention Center, Room 109A
3:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Sponsored by the British Pharmacological Society; and the ASPET Divisions for Cardiovascular Pharmacology; Drug Discovery and Development; and Integrative Systems, Translational and Clinical Pharmacology
Chair: Selim Cellek, Cranfield Univ., Bedfordshire

Despite the successful pharmacological agents such as PDE5 inhibitors, alpha blockers and 5-alpha reductase inhibitors, erectile dysfunction and benign prostatic hyperplasia remain difficult-to-treat diseases. The aim of this symposium will be to provide an evidence-based overview of the novel pharmacological agents, stem cell, and gene therapy approaches that have recently been developed for the two diseases. In addition, the session will open a debate on the use of PDE5 inhibitors in both erectile dysfunction and benign prostatic hyperplasia as well as their use for other indications.

     Pathophysiological link between ED and BPH
     Selim Cellek, Cranfield Univ., Bedfordshire

     Soluble guanylate cyclase activators for ED
     Peter Sandner, Bayer HealthCare AG, Wuppertal

     PDE5 inhibitors for treatment of BPH

     Arthur Burnett, Johns Hopkins Hosp.

     Novel therapeutic approaches to ED and BPH

     Michael O’Leary, Harvard Med. Sch.

     Use of PDE5 inhibitors in indications other than ED and BPH
     Ian Eardley, Leeds Royal Infirmary

Student/Postdoc Best Abstract Competition
Westin Boston Waterfront, Grand Ballroom AB
6:30 PM – 8:30 PM

ASPET/BPS Student & Postdoc Mixer
Westin Boston Waterfront, Harbor Ballroom I
9:00 PM – 11:30 PM

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Monday, April 22, AM


ChristopoulosJOHN J. ABEL AWARD LECTURE
Boston Convention Center, Room 107C
8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
Arthur Christopoulos, Monash Univ.
Reciprocal relationships: The yin and yang of GPCR allostery
Introduction: Stephen Lanier, Med. Univ. of South Carolina



Advancing discoveries from the academic laboratory to the market

Boston Convention Center, Room 106
9:30 AM – Noon
Sponsored by the Divisions for Drug Discovery and Development & Pharmacology Education
Chair: Robert Leadley, Schoolcraft Col.

As pharmaceutical companies continue to merge and downsize their basic research efforts in many therapeutic areas, there is an increasing need and interest for academic investigators to think entrepreneurially about their discoveries. This symposium will help guide investigators through the various steps leading to commercialization of their research by covering topics such as intellectual property protection, private and public funding opportunities, regulatory requirements, and the steps required to move a discovery out of the lab and into the marketplace.

     Intellectual property protection: What, when, and how to protect and share your discovery
     Weston Gould

     Regulatory hurdles from bench to bedside
     Ronald L. Dundore, InfaCare Pharmaceut. Corp.

     What to know when working with Technology Transfer Offices
     Ronald J. Shebuski, Cardiovascular Research Consulting, LLC

     Licensing: Do you have what they really want?
     Chris Vlahos, Lilly Res. Labs.

Novel dynamics of cAMP: Towards new therapeutic interventions through compartmentalized signaling networks
Boston Convention Center, Room 107AB
9:30 AM – Noon
Sponsored by the British Pharmacological Society and the ASPET Division for Molecular Pharmacology
Chair: Martina Schmidt, Univ. of Groningen and Marc Peters-Golden, Univ. of Michigan Med. Sch.

The discovery of cAMP transformed the understanding of cellular regulation by providing not only the second messenger concept, but also the discovery of G proteins, G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), and the conceptual roots of compartmentalized signaling. Spatiotemporal dynamics in the subcellular distribution of cAMP signaling networks likely determine the net outcome of cAMP in chronic disorders. This session will explore the spatiotemporal dynamics of compartmentalized cAMP signaling and the roles of adenylyl cyclases, A-kinase anchoring proteins, G protein-coupled receptors, and protein kinase A as possible drug discovery targets.

    Cyclic nucleotide signaling in subcellular compartments
     Manuela Zaccolo, Univ. of Oxford, Balliol Col.

     Adenylyl cyclase as orchestrators of cAMP microdomains
     Dermot M.F. Cooper, Univ. of Cambridge

     Cell signalling in space and time
     John. D. Scott, Univ. of Washington

     Higher order protein complexes and phospholipid interactions in GPCR signaling
     John Tesmer, Univ. of Michigan

     Dysregulation of cAMP networks in fibrotic lung disease
     Marc Peters-Golden, Univ. of Michigan Med. Sch.

     Developing Pharmacological Probes Targeting exchange protein directly activated by cAMP
     Junior Speaker: Xiaodong Cheng, Univ. of Texas Medical Branch

     Modulation of the cAMP pathway by Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing molecules
     Junior Speaker: Leigh Stoddart, Univ. of Nottingham Med. Sch.

New kids on the block: Organic cation transporters and plasma membrane monoamine transporter in neurodegenerative, psychiatric and addictive disorders

Boston Convention Center, Room 107C
9:30 AM – Noon
Sponsored by the Divisions for Neuropharmacology; Drug Metabolism; Integrative Systems, Translational and Clinical Pharmacology; Molecular Pharmacology; and Toxicology
Chair: Lynnette C. Daws, Univ. of Texas Hlth. Sci. Ctr. at San Antonio

In addition to the traditional high affinity transporters for biogenic amines which are the targets for many CNS drugs, organic cation transporters and plasma membrane monoamine transporters have been recently discovered to transport biogenic amines in the brain as well. This symposium will address the significant role of these “newer” transporters in regulation of biogenic amine neurotransmission as it relates to their
1) distribution and cellular location in brain;
2) ability to transport biogenic amines, even in the presence of the high-affinity transporters for these neurotransmitters;
3) neuroprotective actions;
4) sensitivity to regulation by corticosterone and stress and implications for drug abuse and psychiatric disease; and
5) potential as targets for the development of improved therapeutics to treat psychiatric, addictive and neurodegenerative disorders.

     Plasma membrane monoamine transporter: Structure, function, and therapeutic potential for mental illness
     Joanne Wang, Univ. of Washington

     Neurotoxicity in animal models of Parkinson’s disease is mediated by the organic cation transporter-3
     Kim Tieu, Plymouth Univ., Peninsula Sch. of Med. and Dent.

     Organic cation transporters and the plasma membrane monoamine transporter: Uncovering novel targets to treat depression
     Lynette C. Daws, Univ. of Texas Hlth. Sci. Ctr. at San Antonio

     Role of organic cation transporter-3 in stress effects on cocaine reinstatement
     Paul J. Gasser, Marquette Univ.

     Impaired monoamine and organic cation uptake in choroid plexus in mice with targeted disruption of the plasma membrane monoamine transporter (Slc29a4) gene
     Junior Speaker: Haichuan Duan, Univ. of Washington

Role of the coagulation cascade in tissue injury and disease
Boston Convention Center, Room 108
9:30 AM – Noon
Sponsored by the Divisions for Toxicology & Integrative Systems, Translational and Clinical Pharmacology
Chair: James P. Luyendyk, Michigan State Univ.

The coagulation cascade comprises a highly regulated network of serine proteases terminating in the generation of the enzyme thrombin. Exposures spanning hepatotoxic drugs to inhaled particles have been shown to cause activation of the coagulation cascade, and coagulation cascade activation is now believed to not merely be the consequence of tissue injury, but a critical mechanism of disease progression and toxicological response. This session will explore various components of the coagulation cascade and the role they play in staph infection, ischemia/reperfusion kidney injury, nephrotoxicity, heart failure and liver disease.

    Host prothrombin and fibrinogen are critical determinants of pathogen toxicity and host tissue damage following S. aureus infection
     Matthew J. Flick, Cincinnati Children's Hosp.

     Fibrinogen: A biomarker and therapeutic candidate in kidney damage
     Vishal S. Vaidya, Harvard Med. Sch.

     Contribution of coagulation proteases to the vascular inflammation in sickle cell disease
     Rafal Pawlinski, UNC, Chapel Hill

     Liver let die: Coagulation decides
     James Luyendyk, Michigan State Univ.

Fatty acid activation of G protein-coupled receptors: Basic and clinical perspectives
Boston Convention Center, Room 109A
9:30 AM – Noon
ASPET gratefully acknowledges the educational grants from the Institut de Recherches Servier and Janssen Research & Development, LLC for supporting this symposium.
Sponsored by the ASPET Division for Molecular Pharmacology

Chairs: Graeme Milligan, Univ. of Glasgow and Celia Briscoe, Janssen

This session will review what is known about the expression, function and regulation of members of the G protein-coupled receptor family shown to be receptors for free fatty acids. The speakers will also address the pharmacology and mode of binding, both orthosteric and allosteric, of selected ligands, the state of validation of each receptor as a potential therapeutic target and the progress to date of translating the basic molecular knowledge of these receptors into clinically useful drugs.
 

    Overview of the free fatty acid receptor family and the enigma of GPR120
     Celia Briscoe, Janssen

     Developing novel ligands for free fatty acid receptors
     Graeme Milligan, Univ. of Glasgow

     GPR40 as a potential target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes
     Vincent Poitout, Univ. of Montreal

     GLPG0974, a selective FFA2 antagonist: a promising approach for treatment of neutrophil driven disorders?
     Johan Beetens, Galapagos NV

     Phosphorylation and internalization of short splicing variant of the omega 3 fatty acid sensor, GPR120
     Junior Speaker: Omar Sanchez-Reyes, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México

Canadian Society for Pharmacology & Therapeutics (CSPT) Trainee Oral Presentations
Boston Convention Center, Room 109B
9:30 AM – 12:00 PM
Chair: Fiona Parkinson, CSPT

     Introduction
     Fiona Parkinson, CSPT

     Pharmacogenomics of vincristine-induced neurotoxicity in pediatric cancer patients
     Ursula Amstutz, Univ.of British Columbia

     Characterization of the vascular phenotype of the equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 knockout mouse
     K. Arielle Best, Western Univ.

     Genetic and clinical determinants of CYP3A4 activity in patients using 4ß- hydroxycholesterol as an in vivo probe
     Inna Ying Gong, Western Univ.

     Tricyclic compounds inhibit the OATP1A2 transporter
     Jennifer Lu, Univ. of Montreal

     Therapeutic use of eNOS/Caveolin-1 antagonistic peptides for endothelial dysfunction and atherogenesis
     Arpeeta Sharma, Univ. of British Columbia

     Pharmacogenetics of warfarin safety and effectiveness in children

     Kaitlyn Shaw, Univ. of British Columbia

     Decreased nuclear receptor activity mediates downregulation of drug metabolizing enzymes in chronic kidney disease through epigenetic modulation
     Thomas Velenosi, Western Univ.

     Surgery-induced inflammation reduces morphine distribution into cerebrospinal fluid

     Yan Wang, Dalhousie Univ.

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Monday, April 22, PM

CANADIAN SOCIETY FOR PHARMACOLOGY AND THERAPEUTICS AWARD RECIPIENT LECTURES
Boston Convention Center, Room 109B
1:30 PM – 4:30 PM
Chair: Fiona Parkinson, CSPT

     Senior Investigator Award Recipient
     Rachel Tyndale, Univ. of Toronto, Toronto

     Piafsky Young Investigator Award Recipient
     Bernard Le Foll, Univ. of Toronto, Toronto

     Distinguished Service and Education Award
     Jean Gray, Halifax, Nova Scotia

IsoherranenDRUG METABOLISM DIVISION EARLY CAREER ACHIEVEMENT AWARD LECTURE
Boston Convention Center, Room 108
2:00 PM – 2:50 PM
Nina Isoherranen, Univ. of Washington
The biochemistry and clinical significance of CYP26 enzymes in regulating retinoic acid homeostasis
Introduction: Ken Thummel, Univ. of Washington
 

Drug Metabolism Division James Gillette Award & Platform Session
Boston Convention Center, Room 108
3:00 PM – 5:30 PM

     Impact of development and genetic variation on human hepatic CYP2B6 expression and activity

     Andrea Gaedigk, Children's Mercy Hospital & Clinics

     Differences in the catalytic properties of CYP2B6s between common marmoset and human

     Shizuo Narimatsu, Okayama Univ

     The effect of obesity and development on in vitro hepatic metabolism
     Gina Danielson, Univ. of Minnesota

     Transport by OATP1B1 and OATP1B3 enhances cytotoxicity of EGCG and certain substituted quercetins

     Yuchen Zhang, Univ. of Kansas Med. Ctr.

     Evidence for epigenetic regulation of UGT1A1 protein expression and activity in healthy human livers

     Umit Yasar, Tufts Univ. Sch. of Med.

     Active site gating controls substrate selectivity in cytosolic sulfotransferases A and spinophilin

     Ian Cook, Albert Einstein Col. of Med.

     James Gillette Best Paper Award:
     The Role of FcRn in the disposition, metabolism and pharmacokinetics of soluble non-crosslinking immune complexes

     Hamsell Alvarez, Merck Res. Labs.

     James Gillette Best Paper Award:
     Vitamin D receptor activation enhances Benzo[a]pyrene metabolism via CYP1A1 expression in macrophages

     Presenting Author: Shigeyuki Uno Nihon Univ. Sch. of Med.

Neuropharmacology Division Postdoctoral Scientist Award Finalists
Boston Convention Center, Room 106
3:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Keynote Speaker: Lakshmi Devi, Mount Sinai Sch. of Med.

     Cannabinoid 1 receptor as therapeutic target in preventing chronic epilepsy
     Robert Di Maio, Univ. of Pittsburgh

     Dimerization of G-protein coupled Receptors (GPCRs) in Appetite Regulation and Food Reward
     Harriet Schellekens, Univ. Col. Cork Sch. of Pharmacy

     GPR158 and GPR179: a subfamily of orphan GPCRs as a new class of G protein signaling modulators

     Cesare Orlandi, Scripps Res. Inst.

     Increased plasma ammonia concentration contributes to methamphetamine-induced blood-brain barrier damage
     Nicole A. Northrop, Univ. of Toledo Col. of Med.

     Amphetamine and methamphetamine differentially regulate biophysical properties of dopamine transporter
     Kaustuv Saha, Univ. of Florida

     Cross-talk between beta and alpha2 adrenergic receptors in sympathetic neurons relies on protein kinase A and spinophilin
     Christopher M. Cottingham, Univ. of Alabama at Birmingham

     Keynote Address: How to do big science on a modest budget: lessons from deorphanizing a G protein-coupled receptor
     Lakshmi Devi, Mount Sinai Sch. of Med.

Brian KobilkaMolecular Pharmacology Division Postdoctoral Award Finalists
Boston Convention Center, Room 107AB
3:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Keynote Speaker: Brian Kobilka, Stanford Univ. Sch. of Med.

      Identification of substituted benzazepines as functionally selective ligands of the D1dopamine receptor  
     Jennie Conroy, NINDS/NIH

     Development of a membrane anchored chemerin receptor agonist as a novel modulator of inflammation
     Jamie Doyle, Tufts Medical Center

     Non-Canonical Signaling by GPCR-Arrestin-Gβγ Ternary Complexes
     Vanessa Wehbi, Univ. of Pittsburgh Sch. of Med.

     Keynote Address: Probing G protein coupled receptors: a few of my favorite experiments
     Brian Kobilka, Stanford Univ. Sch. of Med.

Drug Discovery and Development Symposium: Gliobiology: emerging concepts in neural-glia interactions in chronic disease
Boston Convention Center, Room 107C
3:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Chair: Michael F. Jarvis, AbbVie

    Reciprocal interactions between motor neurons and surrounding astrocytes in ALS
     John Weiss, Univ. of California, Irvine Sch. of Med.

     Spinal cord neural-glia interactions in chronic pain
     Ru-Rong Ji, Duke Univ. Med. Ctr.

     Regulation of myelination by action potentials and an introduction to neuron-glia interactions
     R. Douglas Fields, NICHD/NIH

     Regeneration-related axon and Schwann cell interactions
     Doug Zochodne, Univ. of Calgary

Local Ca2+ signals in the endothelium: Key regulators of vascular function and dysfunction
Boston Convention Center, Room 109A
3:00 PM  – 5:30 PM
Sponsored by the Division for Cardiovascular Pharmacology
Chairs: Mark T. Nelson, Univ. of Vermont and Sean Marrelli, Baylor Col. of Med.

Endothelial cell Ca2+ is broadly accepted as a key regulator of endothelial cell-dependent dilation of small arteries. Recent studies using sophisticated Ca2+  imaging techniques have shown that endothelial cells experience local changes in Ca2+ under physiological conditions, the frequency and nature of which determine their effect on endothelial cell function. This session will focus on localized endothelial cell Ca2+ signals mediated by two pathways: Ca2+ influx through Transient Receptor Potential (TRP) channels and inositol trisphosphate (IP3)-medicated Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. Understanding these Ca2+ signaling mechanisms in the endothelium is a critical first step in identifying the cause for endothelial cell dysfunction in vascular disorders such as hypertension.

     Conducted vasodilation in resistance arteries: Ca2+ signaling between endothelial cells
     Steven S. Segal, Univ. of Missouri

     TRPA1-induced endothelial calcium signals and vasodilation
     Scott Early, Colorado State Univ.

     Differential regulation of SK and IK channels during endothelium dependent hyperpolarization
     Kim A. Dora, Univ. of Oxford

     Elementary TRPV4 Ca2+ signals regulate endothelium dependent vasodilation
     Swapnil K. Sonkusare, Univ. of Vermont

     Endothelial Ca2+ wavelets and myoendothelial feedback
     Donald G. Welsh, Univ. of Calgary


     Alteration of endothelial CaMKII in AngII-induced hypertensive mice
     Junior Speaker: Chimene Charbel, Montreal Heart Inst.

Behavioral Pharmacology and Neuropharmacology Divisions Joint Mixer
Westin Boston Waterfront, Grand Ballroom D
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM

Molecular Pharmacology Division Business Meeting and Mixer
Westin Boston Waterfront, Burroughs
7:00 PM – 9:00 PM

Pharmacology Education, Drug Discovery and Development, & Integrative Systems, Translational and Clinical Pharmacology Divisions Joint Mixer
Westin Boston Waterfront, Carlton
7:30 PM – 9:30 PM

Y.E.S. Young Experimental Scientist Mixer
Westin Boston Waterfront, Galleria
9:00 PM – 11:00 PM
*21 & older must have ID to receive drink tickets

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Tuesday, April 23, AM


WiP into Shape Networking Walk
Westin Boston Waterfront Hotel, 7:00 AM – 9:00 AM
Meet at the concierge desk.

Pharmacology Education Division Program: The future of Ph.D. education in biomedicine: U.S. and European perspectives
Westin Boston Waterfront Hotel, Grand Ballroom E; 9:30 AM – Noon
Chair: Jane A. Mitchell, Imperial Col. London

     PhD training in the USA: present and future

     Joey V. Barnett, Vanderbilt Univ. Med. Ctr.

     PhD education in the UK: why change?
     Nick J. Goulding, Barts and the London Sch. of Med. and Dentistry

     Standards of PhD education: the ORPHEUS perspective
     Michael Mulvany, Aarhus Univ. Graduate Sch. of Hlth. Scie., Denmark

     Research funder perspective: PhD graduate attributes – future needs
     Alison Hall, NIGMS/NIH

     Roundtable discussion

Acetaminophen induced hepatotoxicity: Lessons learned during the last four decades investigating mechanisms of toxicity
Boston Convention Center, Room 106
9:30 AM – Noon
Sponsored by the Divisions for Toxicology; Drug Discovery and Development; Drug Metabolism; and Pharmacology Education
Chairs: José E. Manautou, Univ. of Connecticut and Hartmut Jaeschke, Univ. of Kansas Med. Ctr.

2013 marks the 40th anniversary of the publication of the pioneering work of Brodie and co-workers in the Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics demonstrating the role of drug metabolism and protein covalent binding in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity. While this work paved the way for toxicological investigations aimed at elucidating the mechanism of acetaminophen toxicity, the precise mechanism of liver toxicity has eluded investigators. This session will highlight what is known 40 years after the initial publication of Brodie’s paper, including the role of biotransformation, the role of mitochondria and oxidant stress, the hepatoprotective effects of Vanin-1, the use of acetaminophen plasma protein adducts as diagnostic markers in acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity.

     Acetaminophen biotransformation and reactive intermediate toxicity: How did we get here?
     Steven Cohen, Massachussetts Col. of Pharm. and Hlth. Sci.

     Mitochondria – oxidant stress and other signaling events associated with acetaminophen hepatotoxicity in mice and humans
     Hartmut Jaeschke, Univ. of Kansas Med. Ctr.

     Role of Vanin-1 in acetaminophen hepatotoxicity: Regulation of thiol homeostasis and immune response to liver injury
     José E. Manautou, Univ. of Connecticut

     Acetaminophen plasma protein adducts: Diagnostic markers and disease mechanisms in mice and humans

     Laura James, Univ. of Arkansas for Med. Sci.

     Induction of neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) in livers of mice treated with toxic doses of acetaminophen
     Junior Speaker: Rakhee Agarwal, Univ. of Arkansas for Med. Sci.

A "reductionist" approach to cardiovascular disease: Inorganic nitrate to nitrite to NO
Boston Convention Center, Room 107AB
9:30 AM – Noon
Sponsored by the British Pharmacological Society
Chairs: Amrita Ahluwalia, Queen Mary Univ. and David Lefer, Emory Univ. Sch. of Med.

While previously considered inactive oxidative metabolites of endogenous nitric oxide (NO) synthesis, inorganic nitrate and nitrite are now known to be reduced back to NO to provide an alternative source of NO under certain conditions. There is growing evidence that this pathway can act as a rescue pathway in situations where the normal healthy endogenous synthesis of NO has been compromised. This session will discuss the therapeutic potential of this pathway and the clinical studies that have translated much of the basic science into therapeutics.

    Inorganic nitrite-a metabolite with a mission!
     Mark Gladwin, Vascular Medicine Inst.

     Nitrite therapy in heart failure: Mechanisms and therapeutic potential
     David Lefer, Emory Univ. Sch. of Med.

     The red blood cell nitrite reductase: A therapeutic target in hypertension
     Amrita Ahluwalia, Queen Mary Univ. of London

     Dietary nitrate/nitrite and pulmonary hypertension
     Reshma Baliga, Barts & The London Med. Sch., London

Purinergic transmission in visceral function and sensation
Boston Convention Center, Room 107C
9:30 AM – Noon
Sponsored by the Divisions for Integrative Systems, Translational and Clinical Pharmacology & Molecular Pharmacology
Chairs: James J. Galligan, Michigan State Univ., Hamid Akbarali, Virginia Commonwealth Univ.

Purines are primary neurotransmitters controlling GI motility, secretion and blood flow as well as contributing to control of bladder sensation and function. They also play an important role in visceral sensation and pain mechanisms. This session explores in detail the various aspects of purine function with a focus on the development of new therapeutic approaches to modulating purine mechanisms as a strategy to treat GI and bladder functional disorders.

     Multiple purinergic neurotransmitters in the abdominal viscera
     Violeta Mutafova-Yambolieva, Univ. of Nevada

     Purinergic control of gastrointestinal secretion

     Fivos Christofi, Ohio State Univ.

     Purinergic synaptic transmission in the enteric nervous system and control of gut motility
     James J. Galligan, Michigan State Univ.

     Purinergic signaling in visceral pain mechanisms
     Christopher Keating, Univ. of Sheffield

Voltage-gated ion channel blockers as potential analgesic agents
Boston Convention Center, Room 108
9:30 AM – Noon
Sponsored by the Divisions for Drug Discovery and Development & Neuropharmacology
Chair: Michael F. Jarvis, AbbVie

Voltage-gated ion channels play an integral role in the regulation of membrane ion conductance, neurotransmitter release, and cellular excitability in neurons. Several nonselective sodium channel blocking drugs have reduced chronic pain in human trials. Recently discovered gain and loss of function mutations of one particular sodium channel isoform implicate this channel as a modulator of nociceptive sensitivity. Inhibition of low- voltage activated (T-type) and high-voltage active (N type) calcium channels leads to analgesia through modulation of neuronal membrane excitability and neurotransmitter release. These results will be discussed in the context of developing new small molecule channel modulators as potential analgesic agents lacking the addictive and analgesic tolerance potential of opioids.

     Structure and function of voltage-gated sodium channels at atomic level
     William A. Catterall, Univ. of Washington

     Chasing men on fire: Sodium channels and pain
     Steve Waxman, Yale Univ. Sch. of Med.

     Novel means of targeting T-type calcium channels to treat pain
     Gerald Zamponi, Univ. of Calgary

     Antinociceptive pharmacology of small molecule sodium channel blockers
     Michael F. Jarvis, Abbott Labs.

     Discovery and early clinical development of potent and selective small molecule Cav2.2 calcium channel blockers
     Simon Tate, Convergence Pharmaceut.

Transcription factors as therapeutic drug targets
Boston Convention Center, Room 109A
9:30 AM – Noon
Sponsored by the Divisions for Molecular Pharmacology; Drug Discovery and Development; and Toxicology
Chairs: Theresa M. Filtz, Oregon State Univ. Col. of Pharmacy and Mark Leid, Oregon State Univ. Col. of Pharmacy

Transcription factors are the proximal regulators of gene expression that control  the nature of a cell — what type of cell it is, what it can become, how it responds — as well as the regulators of aberrant responses, growth and proliferation in diseases as varying as neoplastic transformation to cardiac hypertrophy to insulin resistance. Targeting transcription factors in disease should provide a highly selective means to manipulate cell response, function, growth and proliferation, but in general, transcription factors are considered to be difficult drug targets. The discovery that nuclear hormone receptors respond to endogenous small molecules has led to the realization that it might be possible to target transcription factors with small molecules. This session explores varying approaches in interrupting or mimicking the protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions that underlie the basic activity of transcription factor proteins.

     Regulating the regulators: Transcription factor control by post-translational modification
     Mark Leid, Oregon State Univ.

     Activation of p53 tumor suppression by MDM2 antagonists
     Lyubomir T. Vassilev, Hoffmann-La Roche, Inc.

     Small molecule transcriptional modulators: Structure and mechanism
     Anna Mapp, Univ. of Michigan

     Synthetic strategies for targeting protein-protein interactions
     Paramjit Arora, New York Univ.

     Therapeutic applications of zinc finger nucleases
     Edward Rebar, Sangamo BioSciences, Inc.

Canadian Society for Pharmacology & Therapeutics (CSPT): Practical Pharmacology
Boston Convention Center, Room 109B
9:30 AM – 11:30 AM
Chair: Richard B. Kim

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Tuesday, April 23, PM

 

CSPT: Women and Pregnancy: Safety, Efficacy, Ethics and Research Needs in Pharmacology
Boston Convention Center, Room 109B
1:00 PM – 5:00 PM
Chair: David Knoppert, Children's Hlth. Res.Inst., London, Ont.

     Opening remarks
     David Knoppert, Children's Hlth. Res.Inst., London, Ont.

     Pharmacokinetics and gender differences
     Donald R. Mattison, Risk Sci. Intl.

     Impact of Pregnancy on maternal pharmacokinetics of medications
     Mary F. Hébert, Univ. of Washington

     Pharmacokinetics and Bioequivalence – evaluating the risks
     Gideon Koren, Univ. of Toronto

     Gender barriers in policy and regulation
     Martha Nolan, Society for Women’s Hlth. Res.

     Removing risks to prescribing in pregnancy: next steps in research and regulation. Panel discussion

     Moderated by Donald R. Mattison, Risk Sci. Intl.

     Closing remarks

     David Knoppert, Children's Hlth. Res.Inst., London, Ont.

Cardiovascular Pharmacology Division Trainee Showcase
Boston Convention Center, Room 107AB
2:30 PM – 4:30 PM

     Sestrin2 is cardioprotective against ischemia/reperfusion injury by promoting LKB1-mediated AMPK activation
     Alexander Morrison-Nozik, Univ. at Buffalo (SUNY)

     Pregnane X receptor mediates dyslipidemia Induced by the HIV protease inhibitor amprenavir in mice

     Robert Helsley, Univ. of Kentucky

     Heterogeneity of ATP-sensitive K+ channels in cardiac myocytes: Enrichment at the intercalated disk
     Miyoun Hong, New York Univ. Sch. of Med.

     Genetic deletion of the TRPC3 channel blunts the development of angiotensin II-induced hypertension in mice
     Asif Pathan, Univ. of Arkansas for Med. Sciences

     Angiotensin II receptor blockade, but not ACE inhibition, reduces nocturnal hypertesion and natriuresis in autonomic failure patients with low renin activity
     Amy Arnold, Vanderbilt Univ.

     Aged eNOS-/- mice display increased APP expression, microglial activation, and impaired spatial memory

     Susan Austin, Mayo Clinic

Benedict LucchesiBENEDICT R. LUCCHESI DISTINGUISHED AWARD LECTURE IN CARDIAC PHARMACOLOGY
Boston Convention Center, Room 107AB
4:30 PM – 5:30 PM
Note: There has been a change in speakers.
Benedict R. Lucchesi, University of Michigan
Reperfusion injury: Can it be prevented?
Introduction: Nancy Rusch, Univ. of Arkansas for Med. Sci.

Negative symptoms of schizophrenia: Neuronal circuit, translation and future directions
Boston Convention Center, Room 106
3:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Sponsored by the Divisions for Drug Discovery and Development; Behavioral Pharmacology; and Neuropharmacology
Chairs: Ruggero Galici, Bristol-Myers Squibb and Leslie Jacobsen, Bristol-Myers Squibb

Negative symptoms are a primary cause of disability in schizophrenia, comprising restricted affect, lack of motivation and asociality. These diverse symptoms are not fully explained by the current understanding of the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. This session will bring together preclinical and clinical scientists to summarize the current knowledge on negative symptoms of schizophrenia and to discuss promising treatments and future directors for translational assays and model development.

    Negative symptoms: Clinical features and prospects for treatment
     Brian Kirkpatrick, Scott & White Healthcare

     Emotion and motivation deficits in schizophrenia: The behavioral and neural substrates of negative symptom
     Ann Kring, Univ. of California, Berkeley

     Pharmacotherapies for negative symptoms of schizophrenia
     Leslie Jacobsen, Bristol-Myers Squibb

     Modeling negative symptoms of schizophrenia in animals

     Athina Markou, UCSD

Integrative Systems, Translational and Clinical Pharmacology Division Hot Topics: A (r)evolution in drug discovery & therapy: From organs on a chip and 3D biomimetics to regenerative pharmacology
Boston Convention Center, Room 107C
3:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Chairs: George J. Christ, Wake Forest Sch. of Med. and Sitta Sittampalam, NIH Ctr. for Translational Therapeutics

     Rapid fabrication of architecturally-correct human tissues in vitro by 3D bioprinting: Function follows form
     Sharon Presnell, Organovo Inc.

     Microscale engineering of tissues and organs
     Linda Griffin, MIT

     Human Organs-on-Chips
     Anthony Bahinski, Harvard Univ.

     Silk: A multifunctional biomaterial with applications for controlled drug delivery, tissue repair and engineering 3D tissues
     D. Kaplan, Tufts Univ.

Toxicology Division Symposium: The mitochondrion as a toxicological and pharmacological target
Boston Convention Center, Room 108
3:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Chair: Rick G. Schnellmann, Med. Univ. of South Carolina

     New methods to identify changes in mitochondrial function
     Craig C. Beeson, Med. Univ. of South Carolina

     MitoQ and prevention of mitochondrial dysfunction
     Victor Darley-Usmar, Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham

     Mitochondrial etiology of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease
     Douglas C. Wallace, Children’s Hosp. of Pennsylvania

     Drugs that target mitochondrial biogenesis accelerate the recovery of cellular and organ function
     Rick G. Schnellmann, Med. Univ. of South Carolina

Behavioral Pharmacology Division Symposium: The opioid-cannabinoid connection: A translational, behavioral perspective
Boston Convention Center, Room 109A
3:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Chairs: Margaret Haney, Columbia Univ. Col. of Physicians and Surgeons and Ziva D. Cooper, Columbia Univ. Col. of Physicians and Surgeons

    The endogenous cannabinoid system: an emerging target to treat opioid and cannabinoid dependence
     Aron H. Lichtman, Virginia Commonwealth Univ.

     Pharmacological and neurobiological studies investigating opioid and endocannabinioid interactions in rodent models of stress-induced analgesia
     David Finn, Natl. Univ. of Ireland, Galway

     Pharmacological evidence for opioid modulation of the reinforcing effects of CB1 receptor agonists in non-human primates
     Zuzana Justinova, NIDA, IRP, NIH

     Naltrexone alters marijuana’s analgesic and intoxicating effects in daily marijuana smokers

     Ziva D. Cooper, Columbia Univ. Col. of Physicians and Surgeons

     The potential clinical efficacy of cannabinoid agonists in treating opioid-dependent patients
     Adam Bisaga, NYS Psychiatric Inst.

Cardiovascular Pharmacology Division Mixer
Westin Boston Waterfront, Grand Ballroom D
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM

Drug Metabolism and Toxicology Divisions Joint Mixer
Westin Boston Waterfront, Commonwealth Ballroom A
7:00 PM – 9:00 PM

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Wednesday, April 24, AM



David_Clapham
NORMAN WEINER LECTURE

Boston Convention Center, Room 107C
8:30 AM – 9:20 AM
David E. Clapham, Boston Children’s Hospital, HHMI, Harvard Med. Sch.
Novel ion channels and their regulation
Introduction: Michael Wood, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals

  

Apolipoprotein E: A protein at the intersection of vascular and neurodegenerative disease biology
Boston Convention Center, Room 106
9:30 AM – Noon
Sponsored by the Divisions for Neuropharmacology & Cardiovascular Pharmacology
Chairs: Cheryl Wellington, Univ. of British Columbia and Michael Wood, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals

Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) isoform variability has been identified as an important risk factor of Alzheimer’s disease and as well as shown to influence the risk of cardiovascular disease. ApoE is a multifunctional and polymorphic protein synthesized and secreted by liver, brain, and tissue macrophages. The molecular mechanisms underlying ApoE as a risk factor for disease remain largely unknown. This program will examine evidence for potential ApoE involvement in several disease settings, including atherosclerosis, restenosis, Alzheimer’s disease, and traumatic brain injury. A roundtable discussion will conclude the session by examining how the current knowledge of ApoE disease biology can be exploited in the search for new drugs to treat these disorders.

     Molecular basis for differential effects of apolipoprotein E isoforms on lipoprotein metabolism
     Michael C. Phillips, Univ. of Pennsylvania Sch. of Med.

     Vascular contributions to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease
     Richard Mayeux, Columbia Univ. Med. Ctr.

     ApoE isoform-specific ApoE/Aß complex levels: potential mechanism(s) for AD risk, novel AD biomarker and therapeutic target
     Mary Jo LaDu, Univ. of Illinois at Chicago

     From concussion to dementia: A key role for apolipoprotein E in the central nervous system
     Cheryl Wellington, Univ. of British Columbia

     Roundtable Discussion
     Michael Wood, AstraZeneca Pharmaceuticals

The 5-HT2C receptor: A new target for multiple therapeutics
Boston Convention Center, Room 109B
9:30 AM – Noon
Sponsored by the British Pharmacological Society and the ASPET Divisions for Molecular Pharmacology & Neuropharmacology
Chair: Lora Heisler, Univ. of Cambridge

The 5-HT2C receptor is implicated in a wide variety of behaviors and physiological processes via action in the CNS. 5-HT2C receptor activation provides a tonic influence over the release of various neurotransmitters and neuropeptides and has been implicated in depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, reward, glucose homeostasis, and energy balance, to name a few. With the advent of more advanced genetic technology and more selective 5-HT2C receptor compounds, a greater understanding of the functional role and potential therapeutic application of the 5-HT2C receptor has begun to be realized. This session will look at insights into the 6-HT2C receptor, that allow for a  better understanding of their potential for the treatment of a number of prevalent conditions, including depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, schizophrenia, drug addiction, obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    A bioinformatics approach to 5-HT2C receptor modulation of behavioral patterns
     Laurence Tecott, UCSF

     The effect of Htr2c post-transcriptional modifcation on 5-HT2C receptor regulated behaviour
     Anthony Isles, Cardiff Univ. Sch. of Med.

     A novel treatment for obesity: The 5-HT2C receptor agonist lorcaserin
     Steven Smith, Sanford-Burnham Med. Res. Inst.

     5-HT2C receptor agonists: A mechanistically new target for type 2 diabetes treatment
     Lora Heisler, Univ. of Cambridge

     5-HT2C Receptor agonist anorectic efficacy potentiated by 5-HT1B Receptor agonist co-application; an effect mediated via augmented pro-opiomelanocortin neuron activation
     Junior Speaker: Barbara Doslikova, Univ. of Cambridge

New roles for signaling by G protein beta/gamma subunits
Boston Convention Center, Room 107C
9:30 AM – Noon
Sponsored by the Divisions for Molecular Pharmacology; Cardiovascular Pharmacology; and Neuropharmacology
Chair: Alan Smrcka, Univ. of Rochester Sch. of Med.

Heterotrimeric G protein beta/gamma subunits were discovered more than 30 years ago as essential components of the GPCR signal transduction machinery. More current studies have shown that instead of (in addition to) serving a scaffolding role, these components of the GPCR complex also play an important role in downstream signaling, implying a potential role as therapeutic targets. This session will explore their potential role in development, angiogenesis, parkinsonism, inflammation, heart failure, subcellular signaling, and neural circuitry.

    Pharmacological targeting of Gbg subunits: Mechanisms and outcomes
     Alan Smrcka, Univ. of Rochester Sch. of Med.

     Translocation of Gbetagamma subunits to subcellular compartments
     N. Gautam, Washington Univ. Sch. of Med.

     Distinct roles for individual G bg isoforms in neurological signaling circuits
     Janet Robishaw, Weis Ctr. for Res.

     Scaffolding of Gbg by WD40 repeat proteins
     Songhai Chen, Univ. of Iowa

     G protein betagamma subunits in regulating trafficking and assembly of signaling complexes
     Terry Hébert, McGill Univ.

Pharmacological enhancement of wakefulness
Boston Convention Center, Room 107B
9:30 AM – Noon
Sponsored by the Divisions for Behavioral Pharmacology; Integrative Systems, Translational and Clinical Pharmacology; and Neuropharmacology
Chair: Jeff Witkin, Eli Lilly and Co.

This symposium will investigate the clinical need for wake promoting agents for the treatment of sleep apnea, shift work and other conditions of fatigue. Both the pharmacological mechanisms that can impact wakefulness, cognitive augmentation, and their side effects, and new pharmacological mechanisms underlying wake-promoting neurobiology will be addressed.

     Introduction to wake promotion
     Dale M. Edgar, Eli Lilly and Co.

     Physiological control systems for wakefulness
     Luis De Lecea, Stanford Univ.

     Modafanil (Provigil) as a wake-promoting agent
     Jeff Vaught, Former CSO/Executive VP Cephalon

     Histamine H3 Receptor Inverse Agonisim
     Jean-Charles Schwartz, Bioprojet

     Metabotropic glutamate receptors as targets for wake promotion

     Keith A. Wafford, Eli Lilly and Co.

Signals activating pancreatic stem cells and beta cell regeneration
Boston Convention Center, Room 108
9:30 AM – Noon
Sponsored by the Divisions for Integrative Systems, Translational and Clinical Pharmacology & Molecular Pharmacology
Chair: Thomas M. Wilkie, UT Southwestern Med. Ctr. at Dallas

Complex physiology drives beta cell expansion in diabetes and pregnancy. Recent discoveries demonstrate the integration of metabolic cues, neural processing and efferent signaling involved in the stimulation of beta cell expansion in diabetes. This session will explore the use of pregnancy as a model for the hormonal stimulation of beta cell expansion, hypothalamic control of islet cell function, the role of RGS proteins in the pancreas as biomarkers of beta cell expansion, and  the use of stem cells as human beta cell progenitors.

     Integrated pathways for type 2 diabetes from mouse genetics and genomics
     Alan Attie, Univ. of Wisconsin

     Small molecule screens in beta cell lines for beta cell expansion
     Bridget Wagner, Broad Inst. of Harvard & MIT

     hESCs and iPSCs differentiation to pancreatic endocrine lineage
     Shuibing Chen, Weill Cornell Med. Col.

     GPCR signaling: RGS biomarkers for pancreas development, cancer and diabetes
     Thomas M. Wilkie, UT Southwestern Med. Ctr. at Dallas

     Pancreatic stem and progenitor cell niche: Pancreatic organogenesis throughout life
     Lola M. Reid, UNC, Chapel Hill
 

The pharmacology of natural products
Boston Convention Center, Room 109A
9:30 AM – Noon
Sponsored by the Divisions for Behavioral Pharmacology; Drug Discovery and Development; Drug Metabolism; Integrative Systems, Translational and Clinical Pharmacology; and Toxicology
Chairs: Craig Hopp, NCCAM, NIH and John Williamson, NCCAM, NIH

The use of natural products by the public for the treatment of illness has  steadily increased. Most of these products have not been proven to be clinically efficacious. Recent studies have highlighted pathways involved in the beneficial actions of natural products, involving inflammatory, immunomodulatory, cell proliferative, and antioxidant targets, as well as assorted pharmacokinetic mechanisms. This session will highlight scientifically based studies underlying the efficacy of cranberry juice for the treatment of urinary tract infections, anti-inflammatory mechanisms of omega-3-fatty acids, the pharmacological actions of cocoa extract, the pharmacology of phytoestrogens, and the potential for using tetra-hydro-palmatine to treat drug abuse.

     Cranberry: Role in prevention of bacterial adhesion
     Amy Howell, Rutgers, the State Univ. of New Jersey

     Novel pro-resolving mechanisms and omega-3 fatty acids

     Charles Serhan, Brigham and Women’s Hosp. and Harvard Med. Sch.

     Natural product's potential for drug abuse treatment
     David Y.W. Lee, Harvard Med. Sch.

     Pharmacological effects of cacao flavanols: From receptors to clinical endpoints
     Francisco Villarreal, UCSD Sch. of Med.

     Prevention of estrogen carcinogenesis by botanical dietary supplements for women's health
     Judy L. Bolton, Univ. of Illinois at Chicago

     Panel Discussion (Questions for Speakers and NCCAM) 

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Wednesday, April 24, PM

Peripheral mechanisms of opioid analgesia
Boston Convention Center, Room 106
3:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Sponsored by the Divisions for Neuropharmacology; Behavioral Pharmacology; and Molecular Pharmacology
Chair: Kelly A. Berg, Univ. of Texas Hlth. Sci. Ctr.

While opioids are a key drug class for the treatment of pain, their CNS effects with the attendant legal and social issues cause significant drawbacks. One approach to eliminate these drawbacks is to target opioid receptors located on primary sensory neurons that mediate pain neurotransmission in the periphery. This symposium will discuss the roles of peripheral delta opioid receptors (DOR) and kappa opioid receptors (KOR) in the molecular mechanisms involved in pain regulation. The potential role of DOR-KOR heteromizeration and interactions with arrestin in the mechanisms underlying peripherally restricted opioid analgesia will be discussed. Results from in vitro experimental strategies and molecular/computational modeling will be integrated with ex vivo and in vivo findings in peripheral sensory neurons to generate insight in the significance of opioid receptors in peripheral mechanisms of opioid analgesia.

    Current status of pain therapeutics
     Ken Hargreaves, Univ. of Texas Hlth. Sci. Ctr. San Antonio

     Molecular determinants and thermodynamics of opioid receptor signaling
     Marta Filizola, Mount Sinai Sch. of Med.

     6'GNTI is a G protein-biased kappa opioid receptor agonist that inhibits arrestin recruitment
     Marie-Laure Rives, Columbia Univ. Med. Ctr.

     DOR-KOR heteromer-mediated signaling and antinociception in primary sensory neurons
     William P. Clarke, Univ. of Texas Hlth. Sci. Ctr. San Antonio

Sleep apnea: A sleeping giant in disease pathologies
Boston Convention Center, Room 107B
3:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Sponsored by the Divisions for Integrative Systems, Translational and Clinical Pharmacology; Behavioral Pharmacology; Cardiovascular Pharmacology; and Neuropharmacology
Chairs: Issy Laher, Univ. of British Columbia and Najib Ayas, Univ. of British Columbia

Sleep apnea is a common disease that is characterized by repetitive episodes of asphyxia and is recognized as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. This symposium will summarize the currently available information on the cardiovascular, metabolic and other consequences of sleep apnea, pharmacological and non-pharmacological management strategies for sleep apnea, and the use of different animal models to study sleep apnea.

     Sleep apnea for non-experts
     Najib Ayas, Univ. of British Columbia

     Animal models of sleep apnea
     Vsevolod Polotsky, Johns Hopkins Univ.

     Sleep apnea as a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases
     T. Douglas Bradley, Univ. of Toronto/Mount Sinai Hosp.

     Sleep apnea and type 2 diabetes
     Esra Tasali, Univ. of Chicago Med. Ctr.

     Biomarkers in sleep apnea
     Atul Malhotra, Brigham and Women's Hosp. and Harvard Med. Sch.

Stem cells: Pharmacology and therapeutics
Boston Convention Center, Room 108
3:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Sponsored by the British Pharmacological Society-Young Scientists and the ASPET Divisions for Integrative Systems, Translational and Clinical Pharmacology & Behavioral Pharmacology
Chairs: Daniel Reed, Imperial Col. London and Jane A. Mitchell, Imperial Col. London

The application of stem cells in pharmacology is quickly gathering momentum and pharmacology is of great importance for the optimal use of stem cells in regenerative medicine. This session, organized by the Young Scientists Group of the British Pharmacological Society, will address how and why pharmacology is important in stem cell research and vice versa. Speakers will address how stem cells can be used in cardiovascular pharmacology and the treatment of cardiovascular disease, the pharmacologic mobilization and activation of endogenous stem cells and stem cell progenitors, the role of stem cells in neuroprotection, and the use of stem cell derived cells as model systems for screening.

    Introduction to stem cells in pharmacology
     Daniel Reed, Imperial Col. London

     Stem cells as a platform for biotherapeutic drug safety screening
     Jane A. Mitchell, Imperial Col. London

     Stem cells: the future of therapy for pulmonary hypertension
     Duncan J. Stewart, Ottawa Hosp. Res. Inst.

     Cell based solutions for cardiovascular disease
     Doris A. Taylor, Texas Heart Inst.

     Microfluidic and materials approaches to determining cell fate
     Armon Sharei and Janeta Zoldan, MIT

     Bioinformatic analysis of microglia-neural stem cell interactions: a role for wnt5a

     Junior Speaker: Maya Woodbury, Boston Univ. Sch. of Med.

Systems biology answering pharmacological questions   
Boston Convention Center, Room 109A
3:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Sponsored by the Divisions for Toxicology & Integrative Systems, Translational and Clinical Pharmacology
Chairs: Rick Neubig, Univ. of Michigan and John Lazo, Univ. of Virginia Sch. of Med.

While the paradigm of one-drug-one-target has lead to important advances in therapeutics, it is becoming clear that the complex interplay of biological systems can greatly influence the response of a drug. Moreover, drugs often exploit multiple targets within an organism. A more complete understanding of all of the interacting elements of a signaling pathway, transcriptional network, or neural circuit may be necessary to accurately predict the response to a given drug. Complex biological interactions such as redundancy and feedback have important implications for both acute responses and the development of resistance. The availability of large data sets of protein structure and interactions, genomic variations, and compound actions permit a more thorough analysis of such questions. Leading researchers in this new and rapidly developing area will discuss how the use of complex systems approaches can be used to explore mechanisms of drug resistance, design novel therapeutic agents, and predict efficacy.

     Systems medicine, innovation technologies and proactive P4 medicine: Transforming healthcare
     Leroy Hood, Inst. for Systems Biol.

     Network models in cancer pharmacology
     Dana Pe’er, Columbia Univ.

     Practical applications of systems biology in the pharmaceutical industry
     Bruce Gomes, Novartis Inst. for BioMedical Res., Inc.

     Metabolic network analysis to predict therapeutic responses
     Jason Papin, Univ. of Virginia

/uploadedImages/Meeting/Annual_Meeting/Lefkowitz_Bob.gifSIR JAMES BLACK LECTURE
Boston Convention Center, Room 157ABC
2:00 PM – 2:50 PM
Robert J. Lefkowitz, Duke Univ. Med. Ctr.
Molecular mechanisms of biased agonism at 7 transmembrane receptors
Introduction: Humphrey Rang, British Pharmacological Society

Note: This lecture and session are part of a colloquium on G-Protein Coupled Receptors which continues Wednesday evening and Thursday. While this lecture and session are open to any EB registrant, attendance at the poster session, dinner, and remainder of the colloquium Wednesday evening and Thursday requires separate registration.

Colloquium Symposium:
Bridging the efficacy divide: Novel molecular insights driving biased ligand drug discovery

Boston Convention Center, Room 157ABC
3:00 PM – 5:30 PM
Chairs: Arthur Christopoulos, Monash Univ., Victoria and Robert J. Lefkowitz, Duke Univ. Med. Ctr.

    Biased ligands: Developing better drugs through selective signaling at GPCRs
     Jonathan Violin, Tevana Inc.

     Ligand-biased signaling under the light of BRET
     Michel Bouvier, Univ. of Montréal

     Allosteric modulation of endogenous metabolites: Implications for on- and off-target drug action and bias
     Patrick M. Sexton, Monash Univ., Victoria

     Moving from biased signaling to functional (physiological) bias
     Andrew Tobin, Univ of Leicester

     The atypical antipsychotic clozapine induces 5-HT2AR-mediated signaling and behavioral events in a beta-arrestin2-independent but Akt-dependent manner
     Junior Speaker: Cullen Schmid, The Scripps Res. Inst.

For the remainder of the G-Protein Coupled Receptors Program, click here. 

ASPET Closing Reception
Boston Convention Center, Ballroom Foyer
6:00 PM – 8:00 PM

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