Sunday April 23 2017

John J. Abel Award in Pharmacology Lecture

Samie R. Jaffrey 8:30 am - 9:20 am 

The John J. Abel Award in Pharmacology, named after the founder of ASPET, was established in 1946 to stimulate fundamental research in pharmacology and experimental therapeutics by young investigators.

Keynote:
Samie R. Jaffrey - Weill Medical College, Cornell University
The Dynamic Epitranscriptome: Encoding the Fate and Function of mRNA with Reversible Nucleotide Modifications
 


ASPET Presidential Symposium: Leveraging New Paradigms for GPCR Drug Discovery

9:30 am - 12:00 pm 

David Sibley ProgramChair:
David Sibley – ASPET President

The field of GPCR biology is moving very rapidly. New structures of GPCRs are being published at an ever-increasing rate and this information is being leveraged by both academic and private sector scientists for drug discovery. At the same time, novel paradigms of GPCR-based signaling, such as allosteric modulation and biased agonism, are now recognized as wide-spread phenomena and applicable to nearly all GPCR families. The symposium will feature state-of-the-art talks exploring the intersection of GPCR structure, signaling, chemical biology and computational biophysics, and how this information can be used to advance the development of novel therapeutic modalities.

Molecular, Cellular and Translational Studies of GPCR Allostery
Arthur Christopoulos - Monash Univ.

Using Signaling Bias to Refine and Improve GPCR-based Therapeutics
Laura M. Bohn - The Scripps Research Institute

Revealing the Structural Basis for GPCR Drug Action through Atomic-level Simulations
Ron Dror - Stanford Univ.

Drugging the Hidden GPCR-ome
Bryan L. Roth - Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill


Behavioral Models of Age-related Cognitive Decline

9:30 am - 12:00 pm 

BEH Web TrackSponsored by the Division for Behavioral Pharmacology (BEH)
Co-sponsored by the Divisions for Cardiovascular Pharmacology, Drug Discovery and Development, Molecular Pharmacology, and Neuropharmacology 

Chairs:
Kevin Murnane - Mercer Univ.
Jennifer Bizon - Univ. of Florida

The modern phenomenon of increased lifespans presents unique challenges as many cognitive capacities decline with age. The last several decades of academic and industry research have resulted in a disappointing track record of bringing new therapies for cognitive aging to the clinic. Behavioral scientists are today developing new animal models of cognition that complement sophisticated molecular biology, genetic, and neuroanatomical approaches. In this symposium, we discuss these advances in behavioral studies, describe multidisciplinary studies of behavioral, molecular, and clinical pharmacology directed towards cognitive aging, and highlight the development of new pharmacotherapies that target brain acetylcholine and glutamate systems.

Introduction
Kevin Murnane - Mercer Univ.

Human Age-related Cognitive Decline: What is it and How is it Modeled
Paul A. Newhouse - Vanderbilt Univ.

Old Word Monkeys, Cognitive Disorders, and Novel Drug Discovery
Alvin Terry - Augusta Univ.

Touch Screen Systems for Assessing Cognition in Aged Rodents
Eric Mohler - AbbVie

Cross-species Decline in Cognition with Aging:  Why Don’t Mammals Other than Humans Spontaneously Get Alzheimer’s Disease?
Carol Barnes - Univ. of Arizona

Using Rodent Models of Prefrontal Cortical-mediated Cognitive Decline in Aging to Identify Drug Targets in GABA and Glutamate Systems
Jennifer Bizon - Univ. of Florida


Tools and Targets: Overcoming Challenges in Modern Drug Discovery

9:30 am - 12:00 pm 

Don Mattison ProgramDDD Web TrackSponsored by the Division for Drug Discovery and Development (DDD)
Co-sponsored by the Divisions for Cardiovascular Pharmacology, Pharmacology Education, Neuropharmacology, and Translational and Clinical Pharmacology 

 Chairs:
Don R. Mattison - Risk Sciences International
Craig Beeson - Medical Univ. of South Carolina

Craig Beeson ProgramHealthcare spending has increased dramatically, while drug discovery research spending has flattened, leading to historic reductions in new molecular entities per billion dollars spent.  This symposium will examine the challenges and opportunities in this new world of drug discovery research.  Drug discovery scientists need to use various innovative tools to advance their novel ideas through target validation, proof of mechanism, screening paradigms, and selection of clinical candidates.  These tools will be described by way of case studies of several successful drug discovery programs.

Drug Discovery Strategies for Rare and Neglected Diseases
David Swinney - Institute for Rare and Neglected Diseases Drug Discovery

Metformin Inhibits Mitochondrial Complex I of Cancer Cells to Reduce Tumorigenesis
Navdeep Chandel - Northwestern University

Tools for the Study of Mitochondrial Function in Zebrafish - a New Platform for Drug Discovery and Development
Sherine Chan - Medical University of South Carolina

Small Molecules for Treatment of Retinal Degenerative Diseases - Targeting Mitochondrial Dysfunction
Craig Beeson - Medical University of South Carolina

Recombinant Human Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloprotease -2: A Novel Anti-Cancer Therapeutic
Amanda Chowdhury - National Cancer Institute 


Cytochrome P450 Structure in Human Health

9:30 am - 12:00 pm 

Ross Wilderman ProgramDM Web TrackSponsored by the Division for Drug Metabolism (DM)
Co-sponsored by the Divisions for Drug Discovery and Development, Toxicology, and Translational and Clinical Pharmacology 

 Chairs:
P. Ross Wilderman - Univ. of Connecticut
James R. Halpert - Univ. of Connecticut

James Halpert ProgramInvestigations of CYP enzyme structure and function have produced a large body of fundamental information of relevance to drug metabolism. Results from mechanistic and structural studies of microbial CYP enzymes have been used effectively to redirect biosynthetic pathways to produce alternative products. Application of knowledge of human CYP enzyme structure and function to prevention and treatment of human disease is much less well developed. Speakers in this symposium will present research at the forefront of this interface related cancer, ocular disease, drug development, and susceptibility to environmental pollutants.

Physical Interactions of Cytochrome b5 with Human Cytochrome P450 Enzymes
Aaron Bart - Univ. of Michigan 

Elucidating Molecular Mechanisms of Cytochrome P450 Steroid Biosynthesis
Stephen G. Sligar - Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Investigating Cytochrome P450 Mediated Cholesterol Metabolism Using Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Structural Biology
Irina A. Pikuleva - Case Western Reserve Univ.

Altered CYP19A1 and CYP3A4 Activities Due to Mutations in the Flavin Mononucleotide Binding Domain of Human P450 Oxidoreductase
Amit V. Pandey - University Children’s Hospital Bern   
 

Using Crystal Structures of Cytochromes P450 to Guide Drug Design
Hao Sun - Covance, Inc.

Human CYP2B6 Interactions with Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers: Biochemistry, Biophysics, and Structural Biology
P. Ross Wilderman - Univ. of Connecticut


Novel Regulators of Platelet Function and Thrombogenesis: Multiple Trails Towards a Broadway

9:30 am - 12:00 pm 

Fadi Khasawneh ProgramTCP Web TrackSponsored by the Division for Translational and Clinical Pharmacology (TCP)
Co-sponsored by the Divisions for Cardiovascular Pharmacology, Molecular Pharmacology, and Toxicology 

Chairs:
Fadi T. Khasawneh - Univ. of Texas at El Paso
Michael A. Holinstat - Univ. of Michigan

Michael Holinstat ProgramThis symposium is designed to provide the audience with a good understanding of not only the current state of the platelet biology and signaling field, but they will be exposed to the state-of-the-art and mechanistic approaches in targeting and development of new classes of anti-platelet therapeutics. Some lectures will present evidence on new regulatory mechanisms of existing platelet targets, and how they can be targeted; whereas others will discuss the contribution of new proteins to thrombogenesis and cardiovascular disease, and their potential to serve as novel targets for therapeutic purposes.

Novel Regulation of Glycoprotein VI (GPVI) Signaling in Platelets
Satya P. Kunapuli - Temple Univ.

Targeting the Transient Receptor Potential Channel 6 (TRPC6)-Dependent Receptor-Operated Calcium Entry for Thromboembolic Therapeutic Purposes
Fadi T. Khasawneh - Western Univ. of Health Sciences

Lipoxygenases: Potent Regulators of Thrombogenesis
Michael A. Holinstat - Univ. of Michigan

Deciphering a Complex Regulatory Pathway for the Platelet Integrin: The G13, Talin and Calpain Triangle
Athar Chishti - Tufts Univ.

Regulation of Platelet Function through Phosphoinositide Kinases and in Particular PIPK5 and PIKfyve and their Role in Platelet-mediated Diseases
Sang Hee Min - Univ. of Pennsylvania

Novel Peptide Micellar Nanoformulation for Treatment of Thrombotic Complications of Sepsis
Misuk Bae  College of Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago

Loss of Rnase1 Produces Coagulation Abnormalities in Mice
Emily R. Garnett University of Wisconsin-Madison


ASPET Poster Presentations

12:30 pm – 2:30 pm 


2016 Tang Prize in Biopharmaceutical Science

(EB-wide lecture for all societies)

1:00 pm – 3:00 pm 

Emmanuelle Charpentier ProgramThe Bacterial CRISPR-Cas9 System: A Game Changer in Genome Engineering
Emmanuelle Charpentier - Max Planck Institute for Infection Biology

The Tang Prize in Biopharmaceutical Science recognizes original biopharmaceutical or biomedical research that has led to significant advances towards preventing, diagnosing and/or treating major human diseases to improve human health. For more information, visit the EB page. 


Reynold Spector Award in Clinical Pharmacology Lecture

Margaret R. MacLean2:00 pm - 2:50 pm 

The Reynold Spector Award in Clinical Pharmacology was established in 2014 by ASPET in recognition of Dr. Spector’s dedication and contributions to clinical pharmacology. The Award recognizes excellence in research and/or teaching in clinical pharmacology.

Keynote:
Margaret R. MacLean - Glasgow University
Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension: From Bench to Bedside (Sex Matters)


Challenges and Opportunities for Childhood Cancer Drug Development

3:00 pm - 5:30 pm 

Sponsored by the Division for Cancer Pharmacology (DCP)
Co-sponsored by the Divisions for Drug Discovery and Development, Molecular Pharmacology, Toxicology, and Translational and Clinical Pharmacology 

Peter Houghton Program Chair:
Peter J. Houghton - Greehey Children’s Cancer Research Institute, UTHSCSA

Developing new treatments for children with cancer presents novel challenges. Childhood cancers are different from predominantly epithelial cancers in adults, with relatively few somatic (tumor associated) mutations, and fewer ‘actionable’ mutations that predict drug sensitivity. Moreover, current cytotoxic drug/radiation therapy approaches lead to long-term toxicities. Hence more effective and less toxic therapies are still needed. With a limited market to interest pharmaceutical company investment, the development of novel approaches that target oncogenic drivers unique to pediatric cancers is being undertaken in academic centers. In this symposium we will focus on several approaches to targeting oncogenic drivers in sarcoma and leukemias.

Introduction
Peter J. Houghton - Greehey Children’s Cancer Research Institute, UTHSCSA

Beyond Leukemia - Targeting the Menin:MLL Interaction in Ewing Sarcoma
Elizabeth Lawlor – Univ. of Michigan

Targeting EWSR1/FLI1 in Ewing Sarcoma
Jeffrey Toretsky - Georgetown University

Small Molecule Inhibitors of EZH2: The Emerging Translational Landscape
Heike Keilhack - Ribon Therapeutics

Preclinical Patient Derived Xenograft Models for Pediatric Cancer Drug Development
Peter J. Houghton - Greehey Children’s Cancer Research Institute, UTHSCSA


Cardiovascular Pathobiology of Inflammasomes

3:00 pm - 5:30 pm 

 Yang Zhang ProgramCVP Web TrackSponsored by the Division for Cardiovascular Pharmacology (CVP)
Co-sponsored by the Divisions for Drug Discovery and Development, Molecular Pharmacology, Neuropharmacology, Toxicology, and Translational and Clinical Pharmacology 

 Chairs:
Yang Zhang - Univ. of Houston
Krishna M. Boini - Virginia Commonwealth Univ.

Krishna Boini ProgramRecent studies have implicated a crucial role of inflammasome in the pathogenesis of autoinflammatory diseases and various chronic metabolic or degenarative diseases. A new concept is emerging that activation of various inflammasomes is the root of or route to many chronic degenerative diseases including cardiovascular diseases. The role of inflammasomes in instigation of inflammation has been well characterized. However, the non-inflammatory roles of inflammasomes in cardiovascular diseases are understudied. This symposium will discuss the uncanonical action of inflammasomes beyond inflammation in cardiovascular diseases and provide new perspectives how we could target such uncanonical pathogenic mechanisms to treat cardiovascular diseases.

Inflammasome in Vascular Injury: Inflammation and Beyond
Yang Zhang - Univ. of Houston

Endothelial Cells, as Conditional Innate Immune Cells, Use Inflammasome to Sense Endogenous Dangers
Xiaofeng Yang - Temple Univ.

The NLRP3 Inflammasome a Common Link in Divergent Fibrotic Diseases
Carol Artlett - Drexel Univ. Col. of Med.

Novel Therapeutic Targets to Treat Kidney Injury and Fibrosis
Jeremy S. Duffield - Univ. of Washington

Podocyte Inflammasomes as a Trigger of Glomerular Sclerosis in Obesity
Krishna M. Boini - Virginia Commonwealth Univ.

NACHT, LRR and PYD Domains-containing Protein 3 (NLRP3) Crucial Role of the Cavernous Tissue Tone Modulation in Mice
Rafael  S. Fais - Ribeirão Preto Medical School, University of Sao Paulo


Physiological Regulation of Drug Metabolism and Transport

3:00 pm - 5:30 pm 

DM Web TrackSponsored by the Division for Drug Metabolism (DM)
Co-sponsored by the Divisions for Cardiovascular Pharmacology, Molecular Pharmacology, and Toxicology 

Edward Morgan Program Chair:
Edward T. Morgan - Emory Univ.

Drug metabolism and transport underlie a large fraction of interindividual variation in drug response.  This symposium will focus on four prevalent physiological factors (development, pregnancy, nutritional status and inflammatory disease) that contribute to this variability. Through mechanistic understanding of how each enzyme and transporter are regulated by different physiological factors, we will be able to better predict drug responses and design rational dosage regimens for special populations and/or individuals.

Drug Metabolism in Inflammation and Parasitic Infection
Edward T. Morgan - Emory Univ.

The Role of Nuclear Factor E2 Related Factor 2 and Sirtuin 1 in Regulation of Biliary Transporters in Fasting
Angela L. Slitt - Univ. of Rhode Island

Altered Drug Metabolism during Pregnancy and Potential Underlying Mechanisms
Hyunyoung Jeong - Univ. of Illinois at Chicago

Contribution of Growth and Development to Interindividual Variability in Drug Biotransformation and Clearance in Children
J. Steven Leeder - Children's Mercy Hospital

L-Tryptophan and Bacterial Modulation of Intestinal and Hepatic Gene Expression
J. L. Dempsey  University of Washington


Mechanistic Studies in Cholinergic Neurobiology: Focus on Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

3:00 pm - 5:30 pm 

NEU Web TrackSponsored by the Division for Neuropharmacology (NEU)
Co-sponsored by the Divisions for Behavioral Pharmacology and Molecular Pharmacology 

Ryan Drenan ProgramChair:
Ryan M. Drenan - Northwestern Univ.

Cholinergic neurotransmission is an important system for regulating brain states such as arousal, attention, motivated behavior, cognitive function, and learning/memory. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors are key players in cholinergic transmission, yet their functional activities in vivo remain poorly described. These receptors are also proven drug targets for neurological disorders such as nicotine addiction. This symposium will focus on mechanistic insights into native nicotinic/cholinergic biology using the latest tools and approaches in animal and cellular models. Details from whole animal behavior to single cell analysis will be discussed.

Inside-Out Pharmacology of Chronic Nicotine
Henry A. Lester - California Institute of Technology

Epigenetic Mechanisms Underlying Long-lasting Developmental Effects of nAChRs on Cognitive Processes
Marina Picciotto - Yale Univ.

Optogenetic Interrogation of Nicotinic Signaling in Fear and Cortico-amygdala Plasticity
David Talmag - Stony Brook Univ.

The Alpha7 Nicotinic ACh Receptor Regulates the Induction of Theta Oscillations in the Hippocampal/entorhinal Cortical Circuit
Jerry Yakel - National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

Dissecting Pharmacology and Neurobiology of Nicotinic Receptors in Nicotine Dependence
Ryan M. Drenan - Northwestern Univ.


Delivering Innovative Solutions in Pharmacology Education: Leveraging Web-Based Technologies

3:00 pm - 5:30 pm 

John Szarek ProgramDPE Web TrackSponsored by the Division for Pharmacology Education (DPE)
Co-sponsored by the Divisions for Behavioral Pharmacology, Cardiovascular Pharmacology, and Toxicology 

 Chairs:
John L. Szarek - The Commonwealth Medical College
Simon Maxwell - Univ. of Edinburgh

Simon Maxwell ProgramEducation of the next generation of scientists and healthcare professionals in the foundational sciences faces various challenges due to a shortage of faculty, increasingly crowded curricula and the ever-expanding complexity of the science. Against this background, many faculty members in pharmacology have to design the curricula, define the learning outcomes, ensure that they are achieved and plan the assessments that will demonstrate this. This symposium will highlight how modern web-based technology can be used to address these issues and describe some of the cutting edge developments in online pharmacology education and the key controversies.

IUPHAR Pharmacology Education Project- Development, Structure and Future
John L. Szarek - The Commonwealth Medical College

Delivering Pharmacology Education to Resource-poor Countries: PharmaFrog: A Pharmacology App for Africa
Leszek Wojnowski - Univ. Med. Center of the Johannes Gutenberg Univ. Mainz

Utilization of Social Media Tools for Student-driven Medical Education
Philip D. Kiser - Case Western Reserve Univ.

Delivering Pharmacology Assessment Online
Simon Maxwell - Univ. of Edinburgh

Implementing a Successful e-Learning Strategy: Overcoming the Common Barriers
Elizabeth A. Davis - Monash Univ.

Technology Demonstrations and Discussion of Best Practices 


Student/Postdoc Poster Competition

6:30 pm–8:30 pm  

ASPET Divisions award Best Presentation prizes for poster presentations by undergraduates, graduate students, and postdoctoral scientists in this annual competition.  Only ASPET members are eligible. You must submit an abstract to BOTH EB by November 17th AND apply to compete through the ASPET online awards portal by November 21st. 


Student/Postdoc Mixer

8:30 pm–11:00 pm  

A little dancing, a little networking…a high-energy event designed for students and postdocs to mingle. 


Last updated: February 15, 2017 

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