In This Section

Program

Invited Program

Members

We are looking forward to an exciting program highlighting the highest quality, innovative science in pharmacology and experimental therapeutics. 

Sessions and activities will be scheduled daily from 10:00 am to 6:30 pm EDT but the conference platform including posters, exhibits, and any recorded sessions will be open 24 hours a day.  Below is a preview of the invited program.

Tuesday, April 27

ASPET Business Meeting and Award Presentations

Hear updates on Society activities and initiatives. Join us in recognizing excellence in pharmacology as we present the ASPET 2021 Scientific Achievement Awards and young scientist Travel Awards.

Protein Kinases in Tune

Chair(s): A. Newton

This symposium, chaired by the 2019 ASPET Axelrod Awardee, Dr. Alexandra C. Newton, will  celebrate the exquisite regulation of protein kinases, one of the largest gene families in humans. The >500 members in this family are instruments nature uses to relay information throughout the cell.  Every instrument not only has a precise and finely controlled role in the symphony that controls cell function, but is itself finely tuned for perfect pitch.  When these instruments are not in tune, the ensuing cacophony is causal in disease.  The symposium will cover protein kinases from structure to biology.  The canceled 2020 Axelrod Lecture will be incorporated in this symposium.

NIH Funding and Other Translational Research Opportunities

Chair(s): R. Roof and S. Koduri

Panel members from scientifically diverse offices within the National Institutes of Health (NIH) will provide information on funding opportunities, resources, and institute interests.  The panel will discuss how to get NIH funding for EB-related research and other opportunities as well as tips for success. Special attention will be given to training opportunites. Discussion will focus on both long-standing NIH interests as well as new initiatives in translation. During the session, a significant amount of time will be allotted for questions from the audience.

Mitochondrial Pathologies and Therapeutic Development – A Tribute to Craig C. Beeson

Chair(s): R. Schnellmann and J. Lemasters

Increasingly, mitochondrial dysfunction is recognized to play an important role in the pathophysiology of many prevalent diseases. Thus, mitochondria represent an important drug target for diverse diseases. Using examples from liver, kidney and the nervous system, this symposium will highlight new developments in experimental therapeutics designed to reverse mitochondrial pathologies and enhance recovery of mitochondrial function. Development of a mitochondrial pharmacology holds promise to fill therapeutic voids in disease management. This symposium will be presented in honor of the late Prof. Craig C. Beeson and will include brief tributes.

Utilizing Educational Tools to Enhance Student Learning in a Virtual Learning Environment

Chair(s): K. Brandl and G. Athauda

The changing landscape of medical education results in the continuous evolution of educators beyond simply being content experts. In order to meet the needs of the new generation of learners, educators must be innovative and tech savvy. In addition, the recent pandemic has challenged the educators to shift to remote teaching. Speakers will present educational tools developed for the mastery of difficult pharmacology content; apps that can be used for “just-in-time teaching”; iBooks and ePubs for interactive self-study learning; and tools for interactive audience participation. Participants will experience these tools through brief interactive demonstrations.

Cardiac Leukocytes: A Therapeutic Quandary

Chair(s): D. Tilley and T. Hale

Heart failure (HF), a progressive disease affecting millions of patients and costing billions of dollars annually, is regulated by inflammatory processes.  Central to these processes are immune cells, which encompass both resident and recruited leukocyte populations that modulate a wide variety of cardiac remodeling responses including myocyte survival and hypertrophy, fibrosis, infarct stabilization and revascularization.  Monocytes, macrophages and lymphocytes each exist along phenotypic spectra that change in response cardiac injury and dysfunction over time.  The therapeutic impact of targeting resident versus recruited, and inflammatory versus reparative, leukocytes on cardiac health and disease outcomes is of significant interest.  The speakers in this session will relay the relevance of these populations in the context of cardiac injury and HF, and discuss when and how their therapeutic modulation may be harnessed to improve HF outcomes.

Updating the Opioid Crisis: Novel Approaches to Reducing Opioid Abuse and Overdose

Chair(s): G. Collins and S. Withey

The United States is in the midst of an opioid epidemic, with current estimates placing the number of opioid-related deaths at more than 70,000 per year. This symposium will provide an update on the current state of the epidemic, with an eye towards challenges that we will face in the coming years. This symposium will also describe novel pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic approaches to combat opioid addiction and overdose, such as opioid-specific vaccines and pseudo-irreversible opioid receptor antagonists. Finally, this symposium will discuss innovative approaches to reduce opioid addiction through the development of non-opioid strategies to relieve pain.

Intracellular GPCR Signaling: Cell Biology, Pharmacology and Physiology

Chair(s): N. Tsvetanova and A. Marchese

GPCRs and their downstream signaling cascades control all essential physiology and accordingly are targeted by close to half of the current drugs on the market. It is now clear that many GPCRs generate a discrete "second wave" of G protein-dependent signaling from internal organelles. Moreover, we are beginning to appreciate that active GPCRs in different compartments can give rise to functionally distinct cellular responses, which in turn could underlie unique physiologies and selective drug actions. This Symposium will feature both established and emerging new leaders in the study of intracellular GPCR signaling whose research collectively spans questions from basic cell biological and molecular mechanisms to physiology and pathophysiology.

Experimental Approaches for the Treatment of Infectious Disease

Chair(s): R. Corriden and E. Anderson

The COVID-19 pandemic, ongoing at the time this proposal is being resubmitted for EB2021, highlights the need for development of novel anti-infective agents. Although academic researchers and the biopharmaceutical industry have quickly responded to develop candidate therapies to address COVID-19, an even larger infectious disease challenge remains largely unaddressed: antibiotic resistance.   Each year in the US, 2.8 million people are infected with antibiotic-resistant pathogens; 35,000 die as a result of such infections. The 2014 UK Government Review on Antimicrobial Resistance concluded that, without a dramatic change in our response, antimicrobial resistance will result in 300 million premature deaths and up to $10 trillion in loss to the global economy by 2050, exceeding cancer as a cause of human mortality. Particularly at risk are patients already more vulnerable to illness from viral lung infections such as COVID-19; in fact, the CDC estimates that 29%-55% of the deaths recorded during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic were caused by secondary bacterial pneumonia.   Many major pharmaceutical companies have abandoned antibiotic R&D after judging it to be unprofitable, creating an innovation gap. Furthermore, because of frequent use of antibiotics for self-resolving issues, physician reliance on unnecessarily broad-spectrum regimes, widespread use of antibiotics in agricultural feed for growth promotion, and pure Darwinian evolution of bacteria, we face a dilemma where new anti-infective approaches are needed. This symposium highlights translational research efforts aimed at resolving this unmet medical need. Since initial submission for EB2020, this session has been adjusted with a renewed focus on respiratory tract infections.

ADME in Neonates and Infants: Therapeutics, Toxicity, and Development of New Drugs

Chair(s): P. Annaert and X. Zhong

Patients at ages of neonate and infant are at developmental ages facing special challenges on drug therapy and toxicity. Most prescription drugs are used as off label for neonates and infants. They have the highest medical errors and adverse drug action rates. There is a specific requirement for inclusion of neonates and infants as a study population for therapeutic efficacy, toxicity, and development of new drugs. Several knowledge gaps exist, making too difficult to study neonates and infants. The aim of the symposium is to bring several experts in the field to discuss studies of ADME at these specific ages.

Diversity and Inclusion Session: Being Heard and Telling Your Story to Claim Your Place – Strategies for Success

Chair(s): L. Devi
Hosted by the ASPET Mentoring and Career Development Committee

The focus of this session will be on implicit bias. We will hear from Dr. Ana E. Nunez, Associate Dean for Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, Professor of Medicine, Drexel University College of Medicine. Her presentation will highlight how to “‘decode’” power dynamics and facilitate your personal success as a researcher, scientist, and expert in your field.  By the end of the session participants will be able to describe how their research success includes personal leadership, self-advocacy, mentoring, sponsorship, and negotiation. There will be interactive small group breakouts and participants are encouraged to bring examples, scenarios, and questions that will enrich the discussion.

ASPET Student - Postdoctoral Colloquium: Strategies for Dealing with Conflict and Difficult Conversations

Chair(s): M. I. Davila-Garcia

Whether we like it or not, conflict is inevitable – in our work and in our lives. In this workshop we will reflect on our communication and conflict styles and explore how our styles may differ from the styles of others. We will also discuss a framework for conflict management and work through specific case studies relevant to research groups. Finally, we will touch briefly on wellness strategies to enhance our ability to deal with the inevitable stress that comes with conflict and difficult conversations.
This session will provide a valuable set of tools for participants to move forward in their careers. There will be an interactive component included that allows participants to practice the guidance that will be provided in the presentation by Dr. Sharon Milgram, Director of the Office of Intramural Training and Education, NIH.

Challenges of Academic Drug Discovery in Cancer

Chair(s): M. Leggas and M. Arkin

This symposium will draw on the experiences of academic investigators to highlight their scientific efforts and challenges in academic drug discovery. Speakers will highlight individual paths and experiences including a new effort between academia and pharma to exploit artificial intelligence and machine learning to accelerate drug discovery. Presentations will feature diverse efforts to develop drugs with topics ranging from the development of new computational platforms for accelerating drug discovery, the identification and pharmacologic targeting of p97 as a novel cancer target, and the development of dual-kinase inhibitors as a polypharmacologic strategy for overcoming adaptive resistance to therapy in acute myeloid leukemia.

Development of Cannabinoids for Clinical Use - CNS Hazards and Therapeutic Effects

Chair(s): M. Delatte and Z. Cooper

The development of potential therapeutic products such as cannabinoids is a complex process that requires the integration of various types of data to understand the potential therapeutic and toxic effects of products in humans.  This symposium will review the regulatory expectations of the FDA for the quality of cannabinoid-containing products that are either botanicals or highly purified drug products, discuss the antinociceptive and adverse effects of cannabinoids in animals and leverage these results to inform the design of clinical protocols, and review the analgesic and adverse effects of cannabinoids in humans.

New Tools in ADME Prediction: Quantitative Omics, Liquid Biopsies and Modeling

Chair(s): B. Prasad and A. Rowland

Characterization of variability in drug disposition is important for clinical study design and individualized drug treatment. As variability in drug disposition cannot be completely described by genetics, characterization of phenotypic variability is critical. This has fostered the development of plasma-derived exosomes as liquid biopsy and endogenous biomarkers for the prediction of drug metabolism and transport. Integration of metabolomics and proteomics data into physiologically based pharmacokinetic models also supports data translation for better prediction of drug disposition. This symposium will provide an update on various non-invasive and in silico approaches to drive the prediction of in vivo drug disposition.

Wednesday, April 28

ASPET Presidential Symposium

Chair(s): C. France

Substance use disorders have increased in frequency and severity during the COVID-19 pandemic and, while the opioid epidemic is most prominent in the media, in many regions of the US the more difficult problem is widespread misuse of stimulant drugs such as cocaine and methamphetamine. Overdose deaths attributed to stimulant drugs alone or in combination with other drugs (e.g., opioids) have increased dramatically over the past several years. The three FDA-approved medications available for treating opioid use disorder (methadone, buprenorphine, and naltrexone) are effective in some patients; however, the opioid epidemic persists and there are no FDA-approved medications for treating stimulant use disorders or the coabuse of stimulants and opioids. In the President’s Symposium experts will provide an overview and update of the current substance use disorder challenges facing clinicians and researchers as well as emerging novel approaches for developing more effective medications.

Heavy Traffic: Targeting Diseases through Chemokine Receptor Antagonism

Chair(s): S. Davis and S. Rajagopal

Chemotactic cytokine (chemokine) receptors are G protein-coupled receptors best known for their role in promoting cell migration by responding to chemokines produced at sites of infection. Although the chemokine/receptor axis is important for normal immune function and wound healing, abnormal chemokine signaling is associated with numerous inflammatory diseases.  This symposium will show how understanding the function and signaling pathways activated by chemokine receptors in order to develop better strategies for treating conditions such as cancer, HIV infection, Parkinson's Disease, cardiovascular disease, and COVID-19.

Cancer Systems Pharmacology

Chair(s): J. Costello and L. Heiser

Systems pharmacology is the application of mathematical and computational modeling to understand the underlying molecular mechanisms that mediate therapeutic response and treament resistance, and to identify optimal treatment strategies. This session will cover diverse applications in cancer systems pharmacology. First, we will explore how measurements of drug response can be modeled as the integration of many cell-intrinsic and -extrinsic factors. Second, we will consider how mutations differentially affect protein function and how these mutations define and alter cellular states. Third, we will present the application of computational models to characterize the relationship between signaling networks and cellular decisions. Finally, we will investigate how heterotypic cell-to-cell interactions differentially affect response to drugs. Each topic combines experimental and mathematical approaches to demonstrate the power of systems pharmacology approaches.

Immune Mechanisms in Pathologic Responses to Particles, Nanomaterials, and Nanomedicines

Chair(s): Q. Ma and K.M. Pollard

Particulates in the micro and nano range, including environmental pollutants, mineral and organic dusts, nanomaterials, nanomedicines, and metabolite crystals, can bio-accumulate in the body and cause a range of pathological conditions. These diseases, which include autoimmune disorders, organ fibrosis, cancer, and allergy, are frequently progressive and refractory to therapy with severe outcomes. Recent research has highlighted critical roles of the immune system in the response to particulates. This symposium will discuss the current understanding of immune mechanisms in disease development caused by particulates, with focus on autoimmunity, mast cell function, innate memory, and the idiosyncratic reaction to infusion of nanomedicines.

Teaching Blitz

Chair(s): M. Hernandez

This session will: 1) showcase innovative strategies and methods for the teaching of pharmacology, physiology, biochemistry, and other biomedical science concepts and 2) briefly discuss how the teaching methods were implemented during emergency remote learning due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Speakers will present their inventive teaching practices or laboratory activities in brief interactive demonstrations followed by audience discussion. Participants will not only gain new teaching ideas but also guidance in how to implement these activities for remote learning.

Julius Axelrod Award Lecture and Symposium:   Targeting Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors for Treatment of Brain Disorders

Chair(s): P. Jeffrey Conn

Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) play important roles in regulating multiple brain circuits and are potential drug targets for treatment of a range of debilitating brain disorders.  However, until recently, highly selective ligands for specific mAChR subtypes have not been available.  Recent advances have yielded the first truly selective activators and inhibitors of multiple individual mAChR subtypes.  Speakers in this session will outline studies making use of these new tools to provide evidence that subtype-selective mAChR ligands may provide novel approaches for treatment of multiple brain disorders, including schizophrenia (Conn), dystonia (Hess), Rett syndrome (Gogliotto), and neurodegenerative disorders (Tobin). 

46 Years of GPCR Pharmacology and Mentoring in the Field of Pain Research

Chair(s): J. Clark and K. Standifer

Gavril Pasternak’s 45+ years in science produced 400 papers, 14 patents and numerous well mentored students, postdoctoral fellows, residents and visiting professors. ASPET recognized Dr. Pasternak with the Julius Axelrod award in 2012 for his contributions to the discipline of pharmacology and his mentorship of pharmacologists. To honor Gavril Pasternak, this symposium will highlight advances in opioid and non-opioid receptor-mediated signaling, development of novel pain and cancer therapies, and the significance of Gavril’s body of work.  The symposium will conclude with a panel discussion by former students, postdocs and fellows on careers in pharma and biotech, marketing, academia, FDA, and NIH.

Cardiometabolic Diseases: At the Crossroads of Adipose Tissue and the Heart

Chair(s): M. Tranter and A. Mughal

The heart has the greatest energy requirement of any organ in the body, and up to 90% of this energy comes from free fatty acids released by adipocytes. Thus, adipose tissue biology is intricately linked to cardiovascular health, and the growing obesity epidemic increases the prevalence of cardiovascular disease risk factors for hypertension, atherosclerosis, and myocardial infarction. This symposium will explore novel therapeutic approaches and mechanisms of cross-talk between adipose tissue and the cardiovascular system that mediate metabolic homeostasis and pathophysiological processes.

Cross Talk in Metabolism of Xenobiotics and Endogenous Substrates

Chair(s): A. Pandey and X. Ding

While much is known about reactions and substrates of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes, their specificity towards xenobiotics, drugs and endogenous substrates such as steroid hormones is less well understood. Protein-protein interactions also influence the substrate recognition and metabolism. The topics will address whether drug and steroid metabolizing enzymes can recognize different classes of substrates, how the substrate selection and activities are influenced and whether ambiguity in substrate recognition leads to unexpected metabolic activities.

Pharmacology Education: Addressing the Opioid and Substance Abuse Crisis

Chair(s): L. Gorman and J. Reuben

In the wake of a national crisis involving opioid over-prescribing and overdose deaths, the AAMC and other critical healthcare educational bodies have recommended critical steps across different healthcare fields to improve the integration and innovation of opioid and drugs of abuse education at the foundational and clinical levels.  Pharmacology educators have an essential role to play in this process in developing education processes, vertical and horizontal integration of addictive substance content, and the implementation of pain management education in medical, dental, pharmacy, undergraduate, and graduate courses as well as in interprofessional education. This symposium will elaborate on national education recommendations and briefly share examples from pharmacologists developing and implementing innovative curricula or active learning approaches in different pharmacology educational programs. The chairs and presenters will facilitate an interactive small group discussion to provide a venue for debate and discussion among peers, and they will serve as an expert panel to address questions at the end.

Thursday, April 29

Journals Workshop: An Interactive Guide to Publishing, Reviewing, and Ethics Issues

Chair(s): R. Dodenhoff and E. Scott
Hosted by the ASPET Board of Publications Trustees

The editors of ASPET's journals will lead an interactive workshop to address issues such as manuscript preparation, the review process, what makes a good reviewer, publishing ethics, and copyright issues. Following brief presentations, participants will work with editors and associate editors in small groups to answer questions and work through scenarios addressed by the speakers. Additional questions from participants will be encouraged. The workshop is appropriate for students at all levels, postbacs/postdocs, and scientists who might have an interest in taking on editorial roles in the journals.

G Protein Signaling in Regulation of Metabolism and Diabetes

Chair(s): S. Collins and V. Slepak

G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) activate signaling pathways in the CNS, pancreas, fat and other tissues to regulate metabolism. This signaling is important in normal physiology, and its dysregulation can lead to disease such as diabetes and obesity, which are the major contributing factors to cardiovascular and other disorders. Talks in this session will address recently emerged and understudied aspects of G protein signaling, providing a unifying theme of how targeting novel mechanisms has the potential to be therapeutically relevant in metabolic disorders.

Novel and Integrated Intestine-liver Crosstalk on Hepatic Xenobiotic Metabolism

Chair(s): G. Guo and H. Wang

The liver stays in the center of drug metabolism that is regulated by xenobiotic receptors and endocrine factors during development, physiology and pathology. The intestine and liver are closely interacted and a role of intestine derived factors is emerging in critically regulating the endobiotic and xenobiotic metabolism in the liver. Novel medicine or technologies to treat human diseases will be developed inspired by these interactions. This symposium will bring the best knowledge, novel in vitro and in vivo technology, and application of intestine-liver crosstalk to audience with interest in novel drug development and pharmacology.

The Use of Chemogenetic Tools to Analyze Behavior in Non-human Primates

Chair(s): K. Grant and V.C. Carlson

The in vivo manipulation of specific brain regions is invaluable for unraveling the circuitry bases of human complex behaviors and disease states. Non-human primates (NHP), such as the macaque, are a favorable animal model due to their human homology in cortical expansion sub serving prefrontal associative functions, fine motor control, social context, and physiology. In this symposium, we will describe the use of state-of-the-art chemogenetic constructs in awake-behaving NHPs. We will also discuss validation methods being developed for non-invasive imaging of viral targeting and expression focusing on PET/fMRI in NHPs.

BPS-ASPET Symp.: A Current Perspective of Sphingolipid Signaling as a Therapeutic Target

Chair(s): K. Watterson and S. Kennedy
Sponsored by the British Pharmacological Society.

The sphingolipid system has an increasingly important role in a wide range of conditions and diseases, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes and multiple sclerosis. Biological targets such as sphingosine kinase, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) receptors and S1P lyase are therefore being actively pursued by academics and pharmaceutical companies in an attempt to develop better drugs for the treatment of these conditions.  World-leading researchers, including Professor Sarah Spiegel, the discoverer of the S1P molecule, will give a current perspective on the field, with an emphasis on the molecular and cellular mechanisms that underpin sphingolipid-targeted therapy.

ASPET “Guppy Tank” Translational Science Pitch Showcase

Chair(s): R. Staudt and H. Neelakantan

The “Guppy Tank” competition will showcase four trainee contestants effectively delivering science pitches describing the translational and commercial value of their scientific research. Contestants have been chosen based on initial applications, which were reviewed by a panel of judges chosen from across ASPET (TCP, DDD, and MCD members). Chosen finalists have been trained by expert ASPET-affiliated mentors to craft and develop their final pitch presentations. The session will showcase a keynote talk by a seasoned scientific entrepreneur, who will highlight the hallmarks of a successful science pitch. Finalists will then deliver their pitches, which will be scored by an elite panel of judges. Identified first and second place winners and a “People’s Choice” awardee (identified via online poll question during the session) will be announced.

Behavioral Pharmacology of Biased Agonists

Chair(s): W. Fantegrossi

Development of “biased ligands” preferentially activating specific signaling pathways by stabilizing subsets of receptor conformations that invoke distinct G protein-dependent or -independent signaling are underway. Development of novel analgesics acting via CB1, μ-, δ- and κ-opioid receptors is focused on identification of G protein-selective compounds that are devoid of β-arrestin 2 recruitment because evidence suggests that this may reduce adverse effects. Results of these efforts appear promising in vitro, but in vivo confirmation of biased agonism is relatively rare. This symposium will survey biased agonism across pharmacological classes, focusing on behavioral effects which may differentiate them from traditional unbiased agonists.

Recent Progress in Drugging the ‘Undruggable’ RAS Oncogene

Chair(s): C. Canman and K. Bryant

The KRAS oncogene has always been thought to be undruggable and one of the Holy Grails of targeted cancer therapy.  This symposium will highlight new approaches to selectively target mutant KRAS-dependent cancers ranging from the identification of novel allosteric regions of RAS important for signaling that ultimately could be targeted by small molecule inhibitors and new combination therapy strategies designed to exploit vulnerabilities of KRAS-dependent cancers or reverse immune suppression in the tumor microenvironment.

Gut Microbiota in Drug Efficacy and Toxicity

Chair(s): H. Jeong and P. Turnbaugh

Gut microbiota is recognized as a key player in human health and diseases, but how gut microbiota modulates drug responses remains largely unclear. The overall objective of this symposium is to provide an overview of up-to-date research on how the gut microbiota impacts drug pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, subsequently modulating drug efficacy and toxicity.

Developing Scientists into Best Practice Educators

Chair(s): N. Kwiek

Too often, academic scientists paradoxically demand the highest rigor of evidence for their research projects but then instruct students according to non-evidence-supported practices (including teacher- centered instruction such as lectures). Additionally, as the field of science continues to struggle with underrepresentation by minority groups, even experienced educators need development in creating inclusive learning environments for students of diverse race/ethnicity, socioeconomic background, sexual orientation, gender identity and expression, age, ability, religion, national and geographical origin, and language. As higher education moves toward an expectation of effective learner-centered teaching for all students, it is imperative that universities, colleges, departments, and programs offer appropriate training in and practice of evidence-based, inclusive instructional strategies for their faculty, staff, and graduate students.   In this symposium, participants will learn about innovative strategies and programs to theoretically and experientially develop science faculty and future faculty in best practice teaching, including how to create an educational environment where all students feel valued and have equal access to learn. The speakers come from a multitude of disciplines and academic rank to share their expertise and personal experiences. Interactive strategies will be employed to deliver the content.

Friday, April 30

Division for Behavioral Pharmacology Postdoctoral Award Competition

This session will showcase the work of finalists for the Behavioral Pharmacology Postdoctoral Award. Finalists will be selected based on submitted abstracts.  Members of the Behavioral Pharmacology Executive Committee will judge the presentations, and a single Behavioral Pharmacology Postdoctoral Award will be presented to the winner.

APPLY FOR ABSTRACT-BASED ORAL PRESENTATIONS BY THURS, JANUARY 7.

Submit your abstract to EB in the ASPET topic category called "3017-ASPET Behavioral Pharmacology"  or "3018-ASPET Drugs of Abuse and Addiction - Behavior." 

You must be an ASPET postdoctoral member (join or renew). You must be first/presenting author of the abstract.

Division for Drug Discovery and Development - Notable Platform Presentations

This session will feature students and postdoctoral fellows who submit abstracts for EB 2021. The DDD executive committee will evaluate the abstracts and the best will be selected for oral presentations - the talks range from basic drug discovery to drug development. 

APPLY FOR ABSTRACT-BASED ORAL PRESENTATIONS BY THURS, JANUARY 7.

Submit your abstract to EB in the ASPET topic category called "3022-ASPET Drug Discovery and Development." 

You must be an ASPET student member (undergraduate, graduate or postbac) or an ASPET postdoctoral member  (join or renew). You must be first/presenting author of the abstract. 

Also featured in this session will be a keynote lecture from winner of the Scientific Achievement Award in Drug Discovery and Development (to be announced in January).

Division for Translational and Clinical Pharmacology - Young Investigator Awards Platform, Early Career Faculty Showcase, and Ray Fuller Lecture

This session will feature the Ray Fuller Lecture, talks from the TCP Early Career awardees, and oral presentations from young scientists selected from proffered abstracts.

APPLY FOR ABSTRACT-BASED ORAL PRESENTATIONS BY THURS, JANUARY 7 .

Submit your abstract to EB in one of the ASPET topic categories listed below.  Must be an ASPET undergraduate, graduate student, or postdoc member and the first/presenting author of the abstract (join or renew).

Eligible topic categories:

  • 3028-ASPET Translational Research
  • 3029-ASPET Clinical Pharmacology
  • 3030-ASPET Preclinical Pharmacology
  • 3031-ASPET Metabolic Pharmacology
  • 3032-ASPET Quantitative Systems / Precision Medicine
  • 3033-ASPET Regenerative Pharmacology
  • 3034-ASPET GI Pharmacology

Division for Cancer Pharmacology – Young Investigators Symposium

This session will feature oral presentations by young scientists that are selected from the submitted abstracts.

APPLY FOR ABSTRACT-BASED ORAL PRESENTATIONS BY THURS, JANUARY 7.

Submit your abstract to EB in one of the ASPET topic categories listed below.  Must be an ASPET student member (undergraduate, graduate or postbac) or an ASPET postdoctoral member (join or renew). Must be first/presenting author of the abstract.

Eligible topic categories:

  • 3000-ASPET     Cancer Models
  • 3001-ASPET     Drug Targets in Cancer
  • 3002-ASPET     Anticancer Drug Response
  • 3003-ASPET     Cancer Cell Signaling
  • 3004-ASPET     Cancer Immunotherapy

Division for Cardiovascular Pharmacology Trainee Showcase featuring the Lucchesi Early Career Awardee

This session will feature oral presentations by young scientists that were selected from the submitted abstracts as well as lectures given by the division's scientific achievement awardees.

APPLY FOR ABSTRACT-BASED ORAL PRESENTATIONS BY THURS, JANUARY 7.

Submit your abstract to EB in one of the ASPET topic categories listed below.  Must be an ASPET graduate student member or an ASPET postdoctoral member  (join or renew). Must be first/presenting author of the abstract

Eligible topic categories:

  • 3005-ASPET     Cardiovascular Pharmacology
  • 3006-ASPET     Vascular Pharmacology
  • 3007-ASPET     Cardiac Pharmacology
  • 3008-ASPET     Renal Pharmacology
  • 3009-ASPET     Hypertension
  • 3010-ASPET     Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease

Division for Neuropharmacology Early Career Award Lecture and Postdoctoral Fellow Showcase

This session will feature oral presentations from postdocs selected from the submitted abstracts as well as a talk by the winner of the Division for Neuropharmacology Early Career Award.

APPLY FOR ABSTRACT-BASED ORAL PRESENTATIONS BY THURS, JANUARY 7.

Submit your abstract to EB in one of the ASPET topic categories listed below.  Must be an ASPET postdoctoral member (join or renew). Must be first/presenting author of the abstract.

Eligible topic categories:

  • 3019-ASPET     Drugs of Abuse and Addiction - Cellular and Molecular
  • 3020-ASPET     Neuropharmacology
  • 3021-ASPET     CNS Transporters and Channels

Division for Molecular Pharmacology Early Career Award and Postdoc Competition

This award competition will feature oral presentations from postdoctoral trainees selected from the submitted abstracts as well as a keynote lecture from winner of the Molecular Pharmacology Early Career Award.

APPLY FOR ABSTRACT-BASED ORAL PRESENTATIONS BY THURS, JANUARY 7.

Submit your abstract to EB in one of the ASPET topic categories listed below.  Must be an ASPET postdoctoral member (join or renew). Must be first/presenting author of the abstract.

Eligible topic categories:

  • 3011-ASPET     Receptor Trafficking, Desensitization, and Internalization
  • 3012-ASPET     Allosterism and Biased Ligands
  • 3013-ASPET     Novel Pathways and Targets
  • 3014-ASPET     Modeling, Mutations, and Structural Studies
  • 3015-ASPET     Receptors and Signal Transduction: General
  • 3016-ASPET     GPCR Colloquium

Division for Drug Metabolism and Disposition Okita Early Career Award Lecture, Gillette Award Lectures and Junior Investigator Platform Session

This session will feature a lecture given by the recipient of the 2021 Richard Okita Early Career Award in Drug Metabolism and Disposition, and will feature talks from the authors of the best papers of 2020 from the journal Drug Metabolism and Disposition who received the James R. Gillette Award, as well as abstract-based oral presentations focused on drug metabolism and disposition.

APPLY FOR ABSTRACT-BASED ORAL PRESENTATIONS BY THURS, JANUARY 7.

Submit your abstract to EB in one of the ASPET topic categories listed below.  Must be an ASPET member and the first/presenting author of the abstract (join or renew).

Eligible topic categories:

  • 3023-ASPET     DMD - Other
  • 3024-ASPET     DMD - Pharmacokinetics/Modeling
  • 3025-ASPET     DMD - Metabolic Enzymes
  • 3026-ASPET     DMD - Transporters
  • 3027-ASPET     DMD - Regulation Factors.

Division for Toxicology - Highlights and Advances in Toxicology

This session will highlight advances in toxicology as selected from abstract submissions and the division's award winners.

APPLY FOR ABSTRACT-BASED ORAL PRESENTATIONS BY THURS, JANUARY 7.

Submit your abstract to EB in one of the ASPET topic categories listed below.  Must be an ASPET member and the first/presenting author of the abstract (join or renew).

Eligible topic categories:

  • 3036-ASPET     Biochemical/Mechanistic Toxicology
  • 3037-ASPET     Liver Toxicology
  • 3038-ASPET     Neurotoxicology
  • 3039-ASPET     In Vitro Toxicology
  • 3040-ASPET     Inflammation and Tissue Injury
  • 3041-ASPET     Natural Products.

Division for Pharmacology Education Symposium: Multiple Choice Questions and Open-Ended Questions – How to Assess Pharmacology Knowledge

Chair(s): N. Zaveri and M. Kruidering-Hall

Assessment is an important part of education, to gauge knowledge acquisition and learning, to motivate students, and to enhance retention. Recent changes in licensing examinations makes it even more important to identify and tailor assessments in pharmacology and pharmacotherapy. This session will discuss how to utilize different approaches such as multiple-choice questions, open-ended questions, diagnostic exams, one-liner tests, and other resources to assess pharmacology knowledge in the medical, dental, and pharmacy curricula. The speakers will engage participants with small group activities that provide the opportunity to create assessments that best suit their institution’s needs.

Monday, May 10

Joint Colloquium on G Protein-Coupled Receptors: Evolving Insights from Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Physiology (Day 1)

Chair(s): T. Handel, P. Insel, and J. Pluznick

Tremendous scientific advancements over the last decade indicate that GPCR physiology and pharmacology are much more complex than originally thought and that it may be possible to exploit this complexity to treat a wide variety of diseases. The objective of this colloquium is to expose scientists to recent discoveries and multidisciplinary approaches used to study GPCRs and provide opportunities for establishing collaborations that bridge complementary interests. The two-day event, held May 10-11 in the EB virtual platform, will feature speakers who have made exciting discoveries in GPCR research that range from molecular to systems biology, basic research to translational studies, and pharmacology to biochemistry to physiology.

Thanks to the generosity of our sponsors and support from ASPET, ASBMB, and APS, a ticket for the colloquium is being provided at no extra charge with your paid registration to Experimental Biology. 

Poster presenters accepted for the GPCR Colloquium will be selected from abstracts submitted by January 7, 2021 to EB 2021. Submit to the topic category called “3016-ASPET GPCR Colloquium” within the EB abstract submission system.

Tuesday, May 11

Joint Colloquium on G Protein-Coupled Receptors: Evolving Insights from Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Physiology (Day 2)

Chair(s): T. Handel, P. Insel, and J. Pluznick

Tremendous scientific advancements over the last decade indicate that GPCR physiology and pharmacology are much more complex than originally thought and that it may be possible to exploit this complexity to treat a wide variety of diseases. The objective of this colloquium is to expose scientists to recent discoveries and multidisciplinary approaches used to study GPCRs and provide opportunities for establishing collaborations that bridge complementary interests. The two-day event, held May 10-11 in the EB virtual platform, will feature speakers who have made exciting discoveries in GPCR research that range from molecular to systems biology, basic research to translational studies, and pharmacology to biochemistry to physiology.

Thanks to the generosity of our sponsors and support from ASPET, ASBMB, and APS, a ticket for the colloquium is being provided at no extra charge with your paid registration to Experimental Biology. 

Poster presenters accepted for the GPCR Colloquium will be selected from abstracts submitted by January 7, 2021 to EB 2021. Submit to the topic category called “3016-ASPET GPCR Colloquium” within the EB abstract submission system.



Last Updated: December 11, 2020
Key Dates
January 14, 2021

Last chance abstract submissions open

February 4, 2021

Last chance abstract submissions due

April 27 – 30, 2021

ASPET Annual Meeting at EB 2021

Thank you to our Annual Meeting partners:

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